Harvard-Radcliffe Class of 1964

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On 12/26/2014, Barry Goldstein wrote: I have just published my Yiddish translation of Tolkien's The Fellowship of the Ring. It is available at the Harvard Book Store and at Amazon. Also available: the Yiddish translation of The Hobbit (Harvard Book Store, Amazon).


Ron Adler met Art Norton, John Welch, George Hall, and Tom Warren in Revelstoke, British Columbia, in February 2014 to ski the deep and the steep in anticipation of the 50th reunion. The last time Ron skied with these guys was in 1964, and he could not possibly have imagined that we would be skiing black diamonds together again in 50 years!

Adler, Norton, Welch, Hall, and Warren skiing    Adler, Norton, Welch, Hall, and Warren skiing


The March-April 2008 issue of Harvard Magazine reports as follows:

Out of 80 new operas submitted to New York City Opera's VOX competition, 10 have been chosen jfor partial live performance in May, including Our Giraffe a three-act opera written by Charles Flowers with composer Sorrel Hays. Excerpts from the demo CD can be heard at CharlesFlowers.com.

Surviving Iraq: Soldiers' Stories by Elise Forbes Tripp (Interlink Books) puts 30 veterans of the Iraq war on center stage to narrate their views of the conflict and to tell what has happened to them since. "Ken Burns and Andrew Carroll found these accounts 'fascinating and moving,' and 'humorous and heartbreaking.'"


The January-February 2008 issue of Harvard Magazine reports as follows:

Peter Coppelman has been named a Giraffe Hero by the Giraffe Heroes Project "for a lifetime of sticking [his] neck out for the common good." The project is a national nonprofit organization whose mission is to "move people to stand tall and take responsibility for making the world a better place." It recognizes people "who are already displaying the kind of courage and commitment that inspires others to action." About 1,000 people have been named Giraffe Heroes since 1982, when the organization was founded by John A. Graham.

Lloyd Guptill has just self-published a novel, Dying Out West, through Xlibris. More information is available on the book's Xlibris website. There is also an author page and a book page with an excerpt. "So curious friends have three sites to choose from—a little redundant, but thorough."

Peter Saparoff, LL.B. '67, has been selected as a Massachusetts Super Lawyer for 2007, as noted in articles published in Boston Magazine and New England Super Lawyers. Saparoff is an attorney at Mintz, Levin, Cohn, Ferris, Glovsky and Popeo P.C.

Stephen Weiner has been selected as a Massachusetts Super Lawyer for 2007, as noted in articles published in Boston Magazine and New England Super Lawyers. Weiner is an attorney at Mintz, Levin, Cohn, Ferris, Glovsky and Popeo P.C.


The November-December 2007 issue of Harvard Magazine reports as follows:

Scott Harshbarger, LL.B. '68, was honored on June 3 by the City of Cambridge for his service as district attorney of Middlesex County and attorney general of the Commonwealth as a "distinguished Cantabrigian who has devoted much of his life to public service," and the corner of John F. Kennedy Street and Memorial Drive was dedicated as "Scott Harshbarger Square." The tribute was initiated by city councilor and Middlesex Superior Court clerk Michael Sullivan and Harshbarger's wife, Judy Stephenson, and coincided with his sixty-fifth birthday. Many colleagues and friends, including professional and business leaders, as well as classmates and Cambridge residents John Henn, J.D. '67, and Bob Mnookin, LL.B. '68, and roommate Richard Darman, M.B.A. '67, Ed. '79 (who flew from Washington for the occasion), attended the ceremony; Harshbarger thanked the diverse group for their role in any success he had had. He was joined by his family, including two sons, Michael and Benjamin, his daughters-in-law, three granddaughters, and his daughter, Tenley Stephenson '91. Harshbarger remarked that the location represented the intersection of his life at Harvard, living in Eliot House and making trips across the bridge to football practice, and his public life, living in and serving the people of Cambridge as well as people throughout Middlesex County and Massachusetts. The new Middlesex district attorney, Gerry Leone '85, presented Harshbarger with a special plaque, citing his appreciation for the dedication, commitment, and standards that Harshbarger established in that office 25 years ago.

Herbert L. Mager Jr. is retiring from Bank of America after a 38-year career. His wife, Bonnie, retired two years ago as a nurse case manager for Alameda County, CA. Herb and Bonnie still live in Oakland. Their son, Evan Mager '99, lives in San Francisco—he and his fiancee, Liz Franklin (Stanford '98), are planning to marry next year.


The September-October 2007 issue of Harvard Magazine reports as follows:

Helen Garvy is the author of Rebels with a Cause: A Collective Memoir of the Hopes, Rebellions, and Repression of the 1960s (Shire). The book is based on interviews she conducted with 28 members of Students for a Democratic Society, the largest student organization of the 1960s. Garvy is a writer and filmmaker.

David A. Murdoch, LL.B. '67, writes, "In May, I gave the greetings of World Learning and the U.S. Experiment in International Living to 350 attendees in Berlin, Germany, at the seventy-fifth anniversary celebration of the Experiment in International Living Federation. I welcome letters or e-mails from all Harvard Experimenters who would like to hear about the event, which was fantastic."

Conrad Plimpton writes, "My twelfth grand child, Theodore, was born to my son Conrad Plimpton II '97 and Beck Stringer '98—their first. I am currently raising two granddaughters, ages six and nine, and an 18-month-old toddler here in Tucson."


The July-August 2007 issue of Harvard Magazine reports as follows:

Daniel Chirot is the coauthor, along with Clark McCauley, of Why Not Kill Them All? The Logic and Prevention of Mass Political Murder (Princeton). "While there have been many genocidal massacres in history, there could have been many more. This book offers strategies for minimizing the risks of deadly conflicts. It is based on scholarly research and on the practical experience of our work in conflict mitigation in Africa, the Middle East, and Asia."

Jay Donahue announces the arrival of his third grandchild, Ella Trivers Donahue, on October 29, 2006, in New Haven. She's the daughter of Matt Donahue '97 and Juliana Trivers '96, as well as the granddaughter of Stephen Trivers '61. Ella's cousins are Liam and Eva Donahue, children of Henry Donahue '90 and Sue. Her uncles also include John Donahue '94 and Mark Donahue '01.

Steve Hrones reports that he was a visiting professor of law this past spring at the law school of the South Federal University in Rostov, Russia, near the Black Sea. He introduced his civil-law students to common law and the to the Socratic approach to the teaching of law. "The only thing that we all agreed on was our hatred of Bush and the Iraq war, as the law classes usually slipped into the political arena with questions from the students."

An exhibition of still lifes in oil from the series "After Pieter Claesz's Still Life with Turtle" by Stephanie Rauschenbusch was held at the Noho Gallery in New York City from June 5 to June 30. "Some of the works can also be viewed on my website."

Peter W. Rodman has left his position as assistant secretary of defense for International Security Affairs and is now a senior fellow in foreign-policy studies at the Brookings Institution.


The May-June 2007 issue of Harvard Magazine reports as follows:

Frances Maher is the coauthor, with Mary Kay Thompson, of Privilege and Diversity in the Academy (Routledge), which explores how the diversification of university faculty "has dismantled and reconfigured relationships of privilege and diversity in higher education." Maher is a professor of education at Wheaton College.

Robert Ritch, A.M."'68, was the 2006 recipient of the Albion O. Bernstein, M.D., Award of the Medical Society of the State of New York for significant contributions to the field of medicine. He has been appointed to the advisory committee of the International Council of Ophthalmology and the board of trustees of Helen Keller International. Vice president-elect of the Association for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology and chairman of the organizing committee for glaucoma for the World Ophthalmology Congress in Hong Kong in 2008, he is professor of clinical ophthalmology at New York Medical College and chief of the glaucoma service and surgeon director at the New York Eye & Ear Infirmary.

Richard A. Ryerson has coedited The Encyclopedia of the American Revolutionary War: A Political, Social, and Military History, a five-volume work coedited by Gregory Fremont-Barnes (ABC-CLIO of Santa Barbara, CA). "It is the most comprehensive reference work on the era of the Revolutionary War now in print, and has been recommended to libraries for purchase by the Reference and Users Services Association, a branch of the American Library Association."

The Triton Museum of Art in Santa Clara, CA, held an exhibition of new works by Sandy Walker, woodblock prints Humans Being 1-10 & The Judith Suite, from January 6 to February 18.

In Rightsizing Your Life: Simplifying Your Surroundings While Keeping What Matters Most (Springboard), Ciji Ware offers those nearing retirement steps on how to turn their focus away from possessions and toward their passions instead. She is a health and lifestyle commentator for ABC in Los Angeles.


The March-April 2007 issue of Harvard Magazine reports as follows:

Frederic R. Kellogg, LL.B. '68, G '69, is the author of Oliver Wendell Holmes, Jr, Legal Theory and Judicial Restraint (Cambridge). Kellogg offers a "fresh perspective on Holmes" that addresses his leading critics and explains his relevance to the contemporary controversy over judicial activism and restraint.

Daniel B. Reardon writes, "I am working four days a week now as a general surgeon, and for the last six years have assisted with the organization of medical specialty teams to go to the province of Olancho in Honduras for a week of volunteer service. In other news, I am now the proud grandparent of two little boys, Noah and Aaron."

William V. Strauss, president of the Greater Cincinnati and Northern Kentucky law firm of Strauss & Troy, was appointed to the executive advisory council of the University of Cincinnati Real Estate Program. The council provides guidance and support to the College of Business Administration, including the dean, the real-estate program director, and students. "This highly regarded program combines undergraduate and graduate programs in business and economics with extensive specialized coursework in real estate."


The January-February 2007 issue of Harvard Magazine reports as follows:

Gordon Harper, Sachin Jain '02, and Harvard Medical School professor Susan Pories are the editors of The Soul of a Doctor: Harvard Medical Students Face Life and Death (Algonquin Books), a compendium of essays written by HMS students that details the experiences that contributed to their development as doctors. Harper is an associate professor of psychiatry at the medical school.

Robert D. Joffe, J.D. '67, has been elected to the board of trustees of the Metropolitan Museum of Art. The decision was announced by the museum's chairman, James R. Houghton '58, M.B.A. '62, on September 12. Joffe is the presiding partner at Cravath, Swaine & Moore LLP in New York City.

Pauline H. Tesler is coauthor of Collaborative Divorce: The Revolutionary New Way to Restructure Your Family, Resolve Legal Issues, and Move On with Your Life. Tesler is a family-law specialist and a fellow of the American Academy of Matrimonial Lawyers.

Anthony Urick writes, "After retiring from John Hancock, I took a job as credit manager in the securities valuation office of the NAIL in Manhattan, which rates all unrated securities held by the insurance industry. I'm now working there two weeks a month as a senior advisor. Louise and I have taken Florida residency in Bonita Springs (near Naples). We can be reached at ."


The May-June 2006 issue of Harvard Magazine reports as follows:

A Hixon family reunion on July 29-31, 2005, in LaCross, WI, included several Harvard graduates: Charles Pierce, M.A.T. '66, Ph.D. '70, Barbara Hanson Pierce '68, Frank Hixon Foster '83, M.B.A. '93, and Adelaide (Addle) Ellen Foster Miller '88.

Joe Ashby Porter was featured recently in Golden Handcuffs Review.com with a new short story, an excerpt of his new novel, The Near Future, and responses to his fiction by Harry Mathews, Toby Olson, Emily Grosholz, and James Tierney. Along with Mathews and Tierney, Porter will appear in Ultrafiction, a reading and booksigning, on May 19 at KGB in Manhattan. Porter also had a new short story in a recent Yale Review. His alter ego, Shakespearean Joseph A. Porter, has been interviewed for an NPR What's the Word? segment scheduled to air later this year.


The January-February 2006 issue of Harvard Magazine reports as follows:

Nancy Bunge is the author of Master Class: Lessons from Leading Writers (Univ. of Iowa), a collection of interviews and insights from 29 experts. Bunge is a professor in the Department of Writing, Rhetoric, and American Cultures at Michigan State.

John Murphy retired from teaching after 35 years as professor of political science at Northeastern Illinois University. He remains active as executive vice president of the University Professionals of Illinois, Local 4100, AFT, and a vice president of the Illinois Federation of Teachers. "Brenda and I look forward to more time for travel and our granddaughter, Leah, daughter of son John J. Murphy III '89 and Margaret Ferris."

Sandy Walker's exhibition, The quickening Body, was held at Hendrix College's Trieschmann Art Gallery in Conway, AK, this past fall. To view her works, see her website.


Robert Altman writes, "Spring 2005 brought three great events—our (Jane's and my) fortieth wedding anniversary, the birth of our daughter Jennifer's third child (and our third grandchild)—Nathaniel Edelson—and the paperback publication of our son's (John '91) fourth novel, The Watchmen, which was also selected by Book of the Month as their 'Best Thriller' of 2004."

Nat Emmons, LL.B. '67, and the class secretary report that the Eugene Kinasewich Fund Inc. has been established by the family and friends of Eugene Kinasewich, Ed.D. '81 (see his obituary), to recognize "his contributions to humankind; and for his outstanding qualities of integrity, selflessness, leadership, loyalty, and lifelong interest in helping young persons have better lives." The fund provides "financial assistance and opportunities for educational, cultural, artistic, athletic, and any other educational/cultural exchanges from and between needy and worthy young persons from foreign countries and the United States," giving preference to those from, or going to Ukraine. Once the fund's tax-exempt status has been finalized, all contributions from its date of formation (February 2005) will be treated as tax deductible. Checks may be sent to: The Eugene Kinasewich Fund Inc., c/o Arthur Page, Palmer & Dodge L.L.P., 111 Huntington Ave., Boston 02199. For gifts of securities, contact Amie Tracia at Palmer and Dodge, at 617-239-0111 and/or "Please don't be bashful about encouraging people to contribute. We all know how important this was to Gene and how important it is to his family and friends."


The November-December 2005 issue of Harvard Magazine reports as follows:

Daniel Cheever, Ed.D. '74, "will retire as president of Simmons College in Boston in July 2006 after 11 productive years there. My wife, Sue, and I look forward to more time with grandchildren, family, and friends."

Richard B. Nesson was elected executive managing director for legal, regulatory and compliance by the board of directors of the Depository Trust and Clearing Corporation, where he was previously general counsel.

William V. Strauss, president of the Greater Cincinnati law firm Strauss and Troy, is on the board of trustees of Downtown Cincinnati Inc., a private, nonprofit organization dedicated to the revitalization of Cincinnati's city center.


The September-October 2005 issue of Harvard Magazine reports as follows:

Robert Altman writes, "Spring 2005 brought three great events—our (Jane's and my) fortieth wedding anniversary, the birth of our daughter Jennifer's third child (and our third grandchild)—Nathaniel Edelson—and the paperback publication of our son's (John '91) fourth novel, The Watchmen, which was also selected by Book of the Month as their 'Best Thriller' of 2004."

Daniel Cheever, Ed.D. '74 will retire as president of Simmons College in July 2006 after 11 years there and 32 years as CEO of various educational and business organizations.

Peter Coppelman writes, "After 25 years as an environmental lawyer, I have returned to my civil-rights and human-rights roots as general counsel of the National Abortion Federation, a nonprofit organization representing 400 abortion clinics in the U.S. and Canada. Collectively, NAF's U.S. clinics provided about half of all abortions in the country last year. I will not be joining classmates heading off into the sunset of retirement any time soon, since I have a son who is a senior in college (headed to grad school) and a daughter entering her freshman year in college (on her way to becoming an equine surgeon). I suppose you could sum up my nontraditional, public-interest legal career by saying there is nothing I like better than a good fight!"

Sheila Jasanoff, Ph.D. '73, L '76, is the author of Designs on Nature (Princeton), an examination of the interaction of science and government in Europe and the United States. Jasanoff is Pforzheimer professor of science and technology studies at the Kennedy School of Government.

In March Frances Ruley Karttunen and her husband, Alfred W. Crosby '52, M.A.T. '56, were guests of the Prague National Theater at the world premiere of the opera La Conquista, by Italian composer Lorenzo Ferrero. (The Czech production was called Montezuma.) "Ferrero and I shared credits as co-librettists and took curtain calls together. After a two-year collaboration entirely by e-mail and the exchange of CDs and cassettes, Lorenzo and I met for the first time at the Prague airport. The whole experience was unanticipated, unlikely, and unforgettable." See first-night photographs at this link. She has also written The Other Islanders: People Who Pulled Nantucket's Oars.

Family and friends of Eugene Kinasewich, Ed.D. '81, have established the Eugene Kinasewich Fund Inc., to recognize "his contributions to humankind; and for his outstanding qualities of integrity, selflessness, leadership, loyalty, and lifelong interest in helping young persons have better lives." Nat Emmons, LL.B. '67, and the class secretary report that the fund provides "financial assistance and opportunities for educational, cultural, artistic, athletic, and any other educational/cultural exchanges from and between needy and worthy young persons from foreign countries and the United States," giving preference to those from, or going to, Ukraine. Once the fund's tax-exempt status has been finalized, all contributions from its date of formation (February 2005) will be treated as tax deductible. Checks may be sent to: The Eugene Kinasewich Fund Inc., c/o Arthur Page, Palmer & Dodge L.L.P., 111 Huntington Ave., Boston 02199. For gifts of securities, contact Arnie Tracia at Palmer and Dodge, at 617-239-0111 and/or at this . "Please don't be bashful about encouraging people to contribute. We all know how important this was to Gene and how important it is to his family and friends."

Michael Lesk, Ph.D. '70, has been elected to the National Academy of Engineering. The second edition of his book, Understanding Digital Libraries, was published in 2004.

Stephen G. Pauker, M.D. '68, vice chair for clinical affairs in the department of medicine and Jordan professor of medicine at Tufts-New England Medical Center in Boston, has been reelected to the Board of Regents of the American College of Physicians.


The May-June 2005 issue of Harvard Magazine reports as follows:

Weathering the Storm, by Peter H. Wood, offers an analysis of Winsolow Homer's Gulf Stream.


The March-April 2005 issue of Harvard Magazine reports as follows:

After 33 years, Larry Gillis has retired from the courtroom—"voluntarily, but thanks for asking. I keep my oar in by doing some on-line teaching of law courses, and I am the regular host of a talk-radio show in Portsmouth, NH."


The September-October 2004 issue of Harvard Magazine reports as follows:

The seeretary reports that "the friends and family of Joe Barton have established the Joseph Barton Memorial Fund to challenge the cycle of poverty in Colombia, where Joe served in the Peace Corps and kept close ties. They plan to use the fund to set up what may be the first scholarship in Cartagena to help local students attend local universities. Contributions may be sent to Joseph Barton Memorial Fund Inc., 95 Gainsborough Street #304, Boston, MA 02115." Barton died in September 2002.

Laurence Gillis reports that his daughter Carolyn (Smith '99) received her M.S.W. from the University of Vermont. "I guess we're at that age, aren't we?"

Retired international entrepreneur and first-time author John Merrill, M.B.A. '70, has written a historical novel, Sons of Light (Harrow), which offers a look at ancient Jewish conflict with Rome in the early years of the Zealot movement led by Judas the Galilean and others, which culminated in the massacre at Masada.


Richard B. Nesson reported in July 2005 that he was elected by the Board of Directors of The Depository Trust & Clearing Corporation (DTCC) as Executive Managing Director for Legal, Regulatory and Compliance. He was previously DTCC's General Counsel.

Larry Gillis reported in October 2004 that he now has his own talk-radio show ("A Piece of Your Mind") in Portsmouth NH. It is live on WSCA-FM and began in early October. Call in (603-430-wsca), but only if you have something interesting to say. Otherwise, don't bother. Larry added that his paid piece in the NY Times Magazine ("The FibreOptic Confessional") was adapted to the stage and flowered briefly at the Chelsea Theater in NYC ("Unreal Lives", December 2002).

Joe Ashby Porter wrote in October 2004 that he had been honored with a 2004 Academy Award in Literature bestowed by the American Academy of Arts and Letters for "writers of exceptional accomplishment in any genre," with the citation, "From his brilliantly comic first novel onward, Joe Ashby Porter has entered the fiction lists with splendid exhibits in virtually every event or genre -- more widely diverse novels and haunting short stories and sketches. No writer of his gifted generation has shown greater daring or has earned higher praise."

Robert Ritch sent the following note in July 2004.

It's been a busy year. I was Chairman of the Program Committee for the American Ophthalmological Society. I have been appointed to the International Assistance Steering Committee of the American Academy of Ophthalmology, where I am Chairman of the education Distribution Task Force, and the Advisory Committee of the International Council of Ophthalmology. I was elected to the Board of Trustees of the Association for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology and also to the Board of Directors of the New York Eye and Ear Infirmary.

I published another book: Lim ASM, Ritch R, Seah S, Lam DSC: Lowe-Lim's Primary Closed Angle Glaucoma, Elsevier, Singapore, 2004. I have been going back and forth to Asia and was Honorary President of the Fourth Chinese Glaucoma Congress held in Beijing in April.

Meanwhile, we managed finally after 3 years to woodchuck-proof our fence and have been picking tomatoes, cucumbers, lettuce, stringbeans, beets, squash and more. Not too bad for a once-a-week watering.

Life is like toilet paper - the closer you get to the end, the faster it unrolls.

Larry Gillis sent a March 2004 update on his very active life. Here is the latest: "I am now a candidate for the NH State Senate. One of my opponents says she will spend $50,000 to $150,000 (for a job that pays $100 per year!!) The price of my autograph will go up if I get elected."

Grant Ujifusa and Richard Sorenson '65 have started a new business, called ThickEnvelope.com, to assist college applicants in determining the probabilities for admission into the most competitive colleges.


The January-February 2004 issue of Harvard Magazine reports as follows:

Robert Altman is "enjoying semi-retirement, with occasional consulting on educational measurement and outcomes in developing countries, reading, bike riding, keeping in touch with a good group of classmates/friends, and spending time with my grandchildren. Jane continues to practice law, supporting me in the style to which I am growing accustomed. Our son, John Altman '92, has completed his fourth novel for Putnam; our daughter, Jennifer, delights in being able to stay home to raise her children."

Charles Fanning has edited Selected Writings of John V. Kelleher (Southern Illinois UP), a collection of critical essays and translations by John V. Kelleher, Jf '47, professor emeritus of Irish studies at Harvard, where he taught for more than 40 years.

Larry Gillis has been closing out his full-time work as a trial attorney in child-abuse cases for the state of New Hampshire. He continues teaching law courses part-time at Hesser College and on line for Kaplan College. "Distance learning is absolutely the wave of the future. If you haven't tried it, do so immediately!" See www.LaurenceJGillis.com."

William A. Grana, M.D. '68, head of orthopaedic surgery at the University of Arizona, is heavily involved with care for student athletes. "I also serve as the Chicago White Sox local consultant and enjoy working with these professional athletes. I have been elected vice president of the American Orthopaedic Society for Sports Medicine and am still actively involved in fitness and sports activity"

Mark Ratner is coauthor with Dan Ratner of Nanotechnology: A Gentle Introduction to the Next Big Idea (Prentice-Hall).

Act of Creation: The Founding of the United Nations (Westview Press), by Stephen Schlesinger, LL.B. '68, was called "superb" by Richard Holbrooke, former U.S. ambassador to the UN, in the September 28 New York Times Book Review. The Economist gave the book its lead review in the September 13 issue.


Larry Gillis writes, "I am now retired from the active practice of law. I will teach English part-time in the apprentice program at the Portsmouth (NH) Naval Shipyard. Ah, to get paid to talk at people, who have to listen to you!! That's a retirement job!"

Frank Tall and his wife Tomoko (Ueda) are proud to announce the birth December 13th, 2002, of their son Toshiro, who is also the first grandchild of Martin Tall '28. /Considerate boy!/ Arrived in the cold./ Deductible this tax-year./ Aficionados of samurai films will correctly surmise that he is named after Toshiro Mifune.


The November-December 2003 issue of Harvard Magazine reports as follows:

On May 28 the Publishers Marketing Association awarded the Silver Medallion in the Benjamin Franklin Awards autobiography/biography/memoirs category to Rita DeSales French; her husband, Perrin L. French; and Irvin F. Lin for Baltimore's Own Little Italy Artist—The Artwork of Tony DeSales (Genovefa Press). The book reproduces ioo drawings and watercolors by the late artist.

Martin Spechler, Ph.D. '71, will he leading his second group project in Uzbekistan, "Understanding Economic Reform in Uzbekistan," for the Global Development Network.


Bill Grana wrote in September 2003, "I'm currently the head of the Department of Orthopaedic Surgery at the University of Arizona and still heavily involved with the care of athletes, specifically here at the University of Arizona. I also serve as the Chicago White Sox local consultant and enjoy working with these professional athletes. I have recently been elected Vice President of the American Orthopaedic Society for Sports Medicine. I am still actively involved in fitness and sports activity."


The September-October 2003 issue of Harvard Magazine reports as follows:

Arnold Dicke's daughter, Nora Dickey '96, was married on July 20, 2002, to Josh Gilbert. "My wife, Janice, and I have been living in Denver since 1999, where I work for the reinsurance division of the large Dutch financial conglomerate ING."

Michael C. Joseph, M.D., is "back in North Carolina after four final years in Southern California. I'm planning to get to retirement (my second try) by my fortieth reunion. I'm involved in global medical terminology expert systems, enjoying my grandchildren, and still running."

Richard R. Palmer, M.D., writes, "Those of you who got the list of donors to the College Fund for 2002 may have noticed the dagger next to my name indicating 'deceased.' They tried to kill me off but did not succeed! Instead I continue to hew wood and draw water in the practice of psychiatry in the suburban D.C. area.

Mark A. Peppercorn, M.D. '68, professor of medicine at Harvard Medical School and director of the Center for Inflammatory Bowel Disease aat the Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center in Boston, has received the Distinguished Clinicians Award for excellence in patient care and clinical research from the American Gastroenterological Association.

Jeffrey C. Robinson has won the Hazel Barnes Prize at the University of Colorado at Boulder, where he has taught since 1971, for his work on Romantic literature and poetics. The prize, the highest awarded to faculty members, recognizes a career that exemplifies the interrelationship between scholarship and teaching. "I have also won a National Endowment for the Humanities Fellowship for 2003-4 to complete my book, The Poetics of the Fancy, a Counter-Romanticism."

John Weber, who presented at the Getty Center's symposium on mural painting and conservation in the Americas in May, did a two-week residency with the Ragdale Foundation in Lake Forest, IL, in June.


The July-August 2003 issue of Harvard Magazine reports as follows:

Mike Bassett is happy to report the wedding of his elder daughter, Kym, to Michael Reed, of Hingham, MA. He writes, "With sadness and reflections on our own mortality, I read of the passing of Joe Barton and Cal Puckett '65. I last saw Joe in June 2001 in Andover at a memorial service for our coach Steve Sorota. Andover's motto Non sibi—"not for self"—was Joe personified. We and many others will miss him. I probably last saw Cal in some Tokyo gin mill. His erudition and unfailing confidence will be missed.

"Encouraged by Stas Maliszewski (Princeton '66) and Hank Higdon (Yale '63), I took a table for the second biennial Ivy Football Association dinner in New York City. The association honors an Ivy footballer who has gone on to success in his field, thereby celebrating the Ivy tradition of scholar-athlete. Among this year's honorees [was] Tommy Lee Jones '69. Our table included: Hank Hatch '63, Scott Harshbarger, Jim Swartz, Curt Lemkau '65, Jack O'Brien '65, Gene Skowronski '69, Ted Skowronski '69, Tony Smith '69, plus my son-in-law and a good friend willing to serve as our pinata, Tom Israel (Yale '66). To land these hearty souls, I had a ball touching base with teammates, including (with apologies to anyone I may have overlooked): class of '62: Ron Juvonen; class of '63: Hobie Armstrong, Terry Bartolet, Dick Diehi; class of '64: Rick Beizer, Mike Foley, Bill Grana, Paul Guzzi, Chunky Kessler, Bill Southmayd, Brad Stephens, Tom Stephenson, Bob Stringer; class of '65: Paul Barringer; and class of '66: John Dockery and Mike Holland. It was really worth the effort to talk with you all.

"Lastly, I've committed, as an adjunct, to teach a 10-week course in international finance at Northwood University in the West Palm Beach area. If it proves enjoyable, I may have found a new career. Cheers to all. The clock is ticking, so visit those old friends via phone, e-mail, or, better yet, in person."

John Donnelly reports, "My sister, Maryanne, passed away just before Christmas, just after my wife, Taffy, had major lung surgery; thank God, she is doing well. My sons John (software magnate) and Andrew (comedian in New York and L.A.) are doing well, and my son Adam is doing extremely well at Boston University with great grades through junior year. This summer he will be working at NBC-TV for the Conan O'Brien Show for his second summer on the job."

Kendall N. Houk, Ph.D. '68, professor of chemistry at UCLA, received the 2003 Award for Computers in Chemical and Pharmaceutical Research from the American Chemical Society at its national meeting in New Orleans in March. Using computers Houk simulated reactions prompted by proline, a simple protein building block, a fraction of a second at a time, studying the three-dimensional orchestration of atoms as they broke apart, rotated, and clung to each other in transient structures unseen by laboratory methods.

Charles E. McClennen, MAT. '65, Colgate Presidential Scholar and professor of geology, has been named to the Kenan professorship of geology, which "supports and encourages a scholar-teacher whose enthusiasm for learning, commitment to teaching, and sincere personal interest in students enhances the learnnig process and makes an effective contribution to the undergraduate community." McClennen's coastal, marine geological, and oceanographic research of the last 30 years has taken him all over the world; his work in Venice was featured in the WGBH Nova episode Sinking City of Venice, first shown on November 19, 2002.

The University of Pennsylvania has appointed Michael W Meister, Ph.D. '74, the Brown professor of South Asia studies. He chairs Penn's South Asia studies department and directs the South Asia Center. He coedited Multiple Histories: Culture and Society in the Study of Rajasthan (Jaipur and New Delhi, 2002), with L.A. Babb and Varsha Joshi.

Educator Karen Worth, senior scientist at the Education Development Center in Newton, Mass., and a professor at Wheelock College, was among those honored at the San Francisco Exploratorium's annual awards dinner on April 30, as was theoretical physicist and science writer Michio Kaku '68.


The May-June 2003 issue of Harvard Magazine reports as follows:

At the October meeting of the Harvard Alumni Association, Emilie de Brigard received the Hiram S. Humi Schools and Scholarships Award for her service to Harvard and Radcliffe admissions offices over the years.

Stephen Hrones and his wife took a 15-day trip to China last winter to view the famous Three Gorges on the Yangtzc River before the world's largest dam destroys the spectacular sight this June.

Born: to Frank Tall and his wife, Tomoko (Ceda), a son, Toshiro, on December 13, 2002. "Toshiro is the first grandchild of Martin Tall '28. Considerate boy! He arrived in the cold, deductible this tax year. Aficionados of samurai films will correctly surmise that he is named after Toshiro Mifune."


The March-April 2003 issue of Harvard Magazine reports as follows:

Thomas C. T. Buckley Jr. has just published Standing Ground: Yurok Indian Spirituality, 1850-1990 (Univ. of California). An earlier book, Blood Magic: The Anthropology of Menstruation, coedited with Alma Gottlieb (UC Press, 1988) was honored as "the most enduring edited collection" of the past 50 years by the Council on the Anthropology of Reproduction at the 2002 annual meeting of the American Anthropological Association. Buckley reports sailing Spirit, his 32-foot cutter, 14,108 nautical miles to complete a year's Atlantic Circle voyage in June 2002. He is now teaching at Bowdoin College and writing a novel.

In Baltimore's Own Little Italy Artist: The Artwork of Tony DeSales (Genovefa Press), Perrin French, his wife, Rita French, and Irvin Lin have written a work of regional and art history about a Baltimore street artist.

Patricia C. Jones has returned to New York City from Miami, initially to work with Sirius Thinking cofounder, Christopher B. Cerf '63, to develop entertaining educational television shows for children, including Between the Lions, the PBS series that teaches children to read. Recently she added another full-time role: executive director of Non-traditional Employment for Women (NEW), a 24-year-old New York City-based nonprofit devoted to placing women in blue-collar jobs, particularly the construction trades.

Sam Lewis sadly reports the death of Harry Turner after a lengthy illness, during which, Mary Keefe wrote, Turner nevertheless "seemed quite indomitable."


The January-February 2003 issue of Harvard Magazine reports as follows:

Joe Ashby Porter's new book, Touch Wood: Short Stories (Turtle Point Press) has been called "irresistible" by Richard Wilbur. Porter reports that he is giving readings at KGB Bar in Manhattan and elsewhere during the '02-'03 academic year.

Caffe 817 in Oakland, Cal., presented an exhibit of "The Judith Suite," new woodblock prints by Sandy Walker, in September and October, along with related paintings and drawings. See www.sandywalker.com.


The November-December 2002 issue of Harvard Magazine reports as follows:

"The Fiber Optic Confessional," an article by Larry Gillis that was published ini the New York Times Magazine, is being adapted for the stage by Epiphany Theater. It will be presented in December 2002 at the Chelsea Playhouse in New York City as part of a collection of adaptations from the "Lives" feature in the magazine.

Dave Nelson, M.B.A. '68, began swimming in 1973 as a way to maintain good general condition. "In recent years I have participated in an annual 3.25-mile open-water swim at Lake West Okoboji in northwest Iowa. This year I had my best time ever, thanks to having set a good pace at the beginning of the race and the effect of a brisk tailwind."

Mark A. Peppercorn, M.D. '68, has received a 2002 Janssen Award for outstanding achievement in clinical gastroenterology. The award recognizes clinical research, teaching, and patient care in the area of inflammatory bowel disease. Peppercorn is a professor of medicine at Harvard Medical School and director of the Center for Inflammatory Bowel Disease at Boston's Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center.


The September-October 2002 issue of Harvard Magazine reports as follows:

Daniel Cheever, Ed.D. '74, writes, "This is my eighth year as president of Simmons College in Boston and fourth year of happy marriage to Sue Stasiowski."

Peter Coppelman is now director of Keep Antibiotics Working, "a coalition of 11 health, environmental, and consumer groups with over nine million members, whose mission is to curtail agricultural overuse of antibiotics."

Samuel R. Friedman asks that his friends send him their email and postal addresses. His records on how to reach them were destroyed along with his office on September 11. Email: .

James Wynne, Ph.D. '69, will be inducted into the National Inventors Hall of Fame this month for the invention, with two co-researchers, of excimer laser surgery. The procedure changes the shape of the cornea, reducing dependency on eyeglasses or contact lenses. A physicist at IBM, Wynne is currently exploring new ways to apply laser technology in the field of dermatology.


Photo of Steve Hoffman and Charles Lyman in China

In October 2002, Steve Hoffman wrote, "Ellen and I just returned from a Harvard Alumni tour of China. It was a fantastic trip. '64 classmate Charles Lyman was also in our tour group. Although we had attended college and reunions together, Charles and I met for the very first time at a dinner of Peking Duck after our first full day in Beijing. Travel half way around the world, and meet a classmate." In the photo Steve is on the left and Charles on the right.

In September 2002 Larry Gillis wrote, "An article of mine in the New York Times Magazine has been adapted to the stage and will be presented at the Chelsea Playhouse in NYC in December. I'm advised that two performances are already sold out. As a criminal trial attorney here in New Hampshire for the past thirty years, I never thought I'd be uttering these words."


The May-June 2002 issue of Harvard Magazine reports as follows:

Frederic R. Kellogg, LL.B. '69, received an honorary doctorate from Bridgewater State College on January 25, 2002. He notes, "Fellow degree recipient Andrew H. Card, Jr., chief of staff to the other president, gave the graduation address."

David A. Murdoch, LL.B. '67, has been appointed honorary consul for the Federal Republic of Germany in Pittsburgh. As a member of the board of directors of the American Council on Germany, he helped to establish a chapter th Pittsburgh. He also serves on the board of the World Affairs Council of Pittsburgh and has worked to foster international education as a board member and now chairman of World Learning (formerly the Experiment in International Living).

Married: Michael Murphy and Dr. Diana Cunningham (Smith '84), overlooking the Taj Mahal in Agra. He reports, "We traveled through India, Nepal, and Sikkim for a month before returning to my investment newsletter and mutual-fund management business and her homeopathy practice. Our shared second career is developing a demonstration farm for permaculture on our ranch south of Half Moon Bay, California. I continue to pursue the world speed record for electric boats, to go with my Class I world record for electric cars set at the Bonneville Salt Flats. For calmer times on the water, we are just completing the restoration of a trimaran that should be on the bay in time for summer sailing."

Stephen Gary Pauker, M.D. '68, has been elected to the board of regents of the American College of Physicians-American Society of Internal Medicine. He is Jordan professor at Tufts University School of Medicine and vice-chairman for clinical affairs of the department of medicine at Tufts-New England Medical Center in Boston.


The January-February 2002 issue of Harvard Magazine reports as follows:

The Boston architectural firm of Shepley Bulfinch Richardson and Abbott has named Oliver Egleston as its new president. Egleston, who has been a principal with the firm since 1994, assumed his new post on October 1, 2001.

Larry Gillis spent two weeks in October teaching a course on criminal procedure in American courts at Vytautas Magnus University School of Law in Kaunas, Lithuania. During the summer, he reports, he appeared as Mr. Brownlow in a local production of Oliver in New Hampshire.


The November-December 2001 issue of Harvard Magazine reports as follows:

The Love Potion Murders, Alfred Alcorn's fifth novel, ran as a serial in 42 parts through mid October in Salon.com. "It features Norman de Ratour, the intrepid if somewhat bungling sleuth of Murder in the Museum of Man."

The State of Georgia touts its business climate in a recent press release that stresses the number of Harvard graduates in the state, including Leo Mullin, S.M. '65, M.B.A. '67, CEO of Delta Airlines.

Thomas D. Parker, Ed.D. '76, is the new executive vice president of the Nellie Mae Education Foundation, which provides grants to education programs and funds research on education in New England.

Peter W. Rodman is assistant secretary of defnse for international security affairs, part of the foreign-policy arm of the Department of Defense.

Darrell R. Wells has joined the board of trustees of the American Printing House for the Blind. He has been general partner for the Security Management Company of Louisville, KY, since 1972.


Marty Spechler wrote in September 2001: "Classmates might like to know I have been leading a research team from Uzbekistan for the Global Development Network of the World Bank, a project designed to understand how to relieve world poverty. During my sabbatical from Indiana University, I also taught at the Central European University in Budapest and worked for NATO in Romania. I will be representing IU at the installation of President Summers on Oct. 12."


The September-October 2001 issue of Harvard Magazine reports as follows:

Michael O'Hare M.Arch. '68, Ph.D. '73, reports that "after about 30 seconds of discussion regarding the excellent free education available at Dad's shop (Berkeley), Elizabeth O'Hare is on her way to Harvard, class of '05."

Armine Kotin Mortimer is author of Writing Realism: Representations in French Fiction, published by the Johns Hopkins University Press.

Griff Price writes, "Nancy Rhodes and I joyfully (although a bit belatedly) announce the birth of our daughter, Carolyn Rhodes Price, on September 15, 1999. Already almost two, Carolyn has reopened her parents' and older siblings' eyes to the magic of the childhood years. It's true; there's nothing like a baby in the house to keep one young!"


In July 2001, Peter W. Rodman was confirmed by the Senate and sworn in as Assistant Secretary of Defense for International Security Affairs. This position is part of the foreign policy arm of the Department of Defense, responsible for security relations with foreign governments and for representing the Pentagon in interagency policy deliberations in Washington. Another recent holder of this office was Prof. Joseph Nye, Dean of the Kennedy School of Government.

After 30 years as a criminal trial attorney in NH and MA, Larry Gillis will be teaching a short course on "American Criminal Procedure" at Vytautas Magnus University School of Law, in Kaunas, Lithuania, in September, 2001. He lives in Rye NH.


The July-August 2001 issue of Harvard Magazine reports as follows:

Peter Coppelman reports, "After seven years as principal deputy assistant attorney general in the environment and natural resources division of the Justice Department, I have returned to San Francisco and joined Sheppard, Mullin, Richter & Hampton. I practice in the area of natural resources and land use. It distresses me to see President Bush target for possible reversal a number of initiatives I worked on, particularly the roadless area conservation rule. However, I am confident that if he decides to wage a war on the environment, he will suffer defeat."

Married: Franklin Tall and Tomoko Ueda of Osaka, in September 2000. "This was the culmination of 30 years of fascination with Japan and much searching for the right mate. Tomoko is a master teacher of flower arranging. We are impatiently waiting for her Canadian immigration papers to come through, so that we can travel freely. Meanwhile I had to go to Brazil by myself to work with former students of mine who are now on the faculty at the University of Sao Paulo. The warmth and sun in February made me wonder why I live in Toronto."


Al Alcorn wrote on July 5, 2001: "You might want to let classmates know that my fifth novel, The Love Potion Murders (in the Museum of Man) is being serialized in the People section of Salon.com. It has 42 'entries' and will run through mid-October. It features Norman de Ratour, the intrepid if somewhat bungling sleuth of Murder in the Museum of Man.

Joe Ashby Porter is Associate Chair of the English Department at Duke University, is Editor in Chief of the New Variorum revised edition of Othello, and has recently published a new novel, Resident Aliens (New Amsterdam/Ivan R. Dee, 2000).

Stephen Hrones was awarded (in May 2000) the Edward J. Duggan Private Counsel Award for Zealous Advocacy for outstanding legal services to the poor by the Massachusetts Committee for Public Counsel Services. The award was based in particular on his five year successful effort to free an innocent young man, Donnell Johnson, who spent five years in prison having been convicted of first degree murder of a nine year old boy on Halloween 1994. The story of that case has been written in a recent book, Boston D.A., by Sean Flynn (Harpers).


The May-June 2001 issue of Harvard Magazine reports as follows:

The newest book by Robin Tolmach Lakoff Ph.D. '67, is The Language War (California).

Married: Harvey McLean and Ruth Elizabeth Boone, in Dallas on May 28, 2000. He writes, "Elizabeth is a Presbyterian pastor who graduated from Princeton Theological Seminary in 1991. I am currently the president of a residential real estate firm, Harvey McLean and Associates."


The March-April 2001 issue of Harvard Magazine reports as follows:

Susan First Pollack, J.D. '67, has joined the law firm of Curtis, Mallet-Prevost, Colt & Mosle in New York City as counsel, specializing in issues relating to financial institutions. Her move back to private practice comes after almost 20 years as a senior lawyer with Citibank. She and her husband, Daniel Pollack '60, LL.B. '65, now have both children in college: Sam is Haverford '97 and Gabriella is in the class of 2000 at Harvard.

Robert Ritch, M.D., received the Heed Award at the annual meeting of the American Academy of Ophthalmology last November. The award is given in recognition of leadership and contributions in the field. Ritch is associated with the New York Eye and Ear Infirmary.

Born: to Kathy Burns and Antonio Rossmann, twin daughters, Alice Sonsini Rossmann (6 lbs., 10 oz.) and Maria McHale Rossmann (5 lbs., 1 oz.) on October 9. Rossmann's address is 6442 Hillegass Ave., Oakland, CA 94618-1312.

Dimitri Villard wrote the screenplay and produced the film In Love and War directed by Richard Attenborough and starring Sandra Bullock and Chris O'Donnell. Based on the book Hemingway in Love and War by his father, Henry S. Villard '21, the film depicts Ernest Hemingway's tragic romance with his nurse during World War I that inspired A Farewell to Arms.


The January-February 2001 issue of Harvard Magazine reports as follows:

Bill Grana, M.D. '68, reports that he is head of the department of orthopedics at the University of Arizona, still involved in sports (tennis, golf, hiking), and hopes to retire there.

John McDonald, professor of English at saint Michael's College, reports that he will be spending the spring semester at Vietnam National University in Hanoi on a Fulbright grant. He will teach American literature and help design a system for accreditation and quality assessment in institutions of higher education. "I am amazed that I have an opportunity like this. I feel I can make a contribution."

The University of Pennsylvania has named Michael W. Meister the Edmund J. and Louise W. Kahn term professor in art history and South Asian studies. He has also edited anew book, Ethnography and Personhood: Notes From the Field.


The November-December 2000 issue of Harvard Magazine reports as follows:

Max Byrd, Ph.D. '70, is the author of a new historical novel, Grant, published in August. "It concerns the life of Ulysses S. Grant," he writes, "especially his amazing friendship with Mark Twain. (I wanted to call it General Grant and Private Twain.) The book was chosen for the recommended summer reading list of NPR's All Things Considered. Now if every classmate buys 10 copies..."

Ed Flitton has been appointed managing partner of Holland & Hart, "a firm with 220 attorneys in 10 offices in five states. I continue to live in Colorado Springs, but will spend most of my office time in Denver, where I have bought a condo.  am enjoying the job, and am adjusting to a life split between two homes."

David A. Murdoch was recently elected chairman of the board of trustees at World Learning, formerly The Experiment in International Living, and took office in October. "I succeeded Stephen Lowey '55. We would love to hear from any alumni or alumnae who participated in the 'Experiment.'"

Since a 1997-98 sabbatical in France, Joe Porter has been "back at Duke, serving this past year as director of graduate studies in the English department. My novel Resident Aliens is scheduled for fall publication by New Amsterdam.  am editor-in-chief of the New Variorum Othello (MLA). Who's Who in America has awarded me an entry beginning with the 2000 edition."

Jeffrey Robinson reports, "Still a professor of English at the University of Colorado at Boulder,  recently published my eighth book, Reception and Poetics in Keats (St. Martins). In 1997  published a book of poems, Spliced Romanticism (Mellen Poetry Press).  would love to hear from classmates, at (303) 440-6923, or ."

Artist John Pitman Weber had a residency and major public project in Spencer, Iowa, from May to August as part of the National Endowment for the Arts' "Artists and Communities 2000" program. He reports that "hundreds of local residents between the ages of 10 and 90" got involved in making mosaics depicting local life and history, and aspirations for the future.


In the July/Aug 2000 issue of Harvard Magazine, Jay Donahue reports with pleasure the birth of his first grandchild, Liam Michael Donahue, who is the son of Henry '90, the nephew of John '94, Matt '97, and Mark '01, and the cousin of Paul Donahue '75 and Suzanne Gauron '01.

The same issue notes that Glancing Back, an exhibit of paintings by John Pitman Weber, was shown at the Koehnline Gallery in Des Plaines, IL, in May and June. Friends can learn more at www.oakton.edu/news/events/gallery.


In the Nov/Dec 1999 issue of Harvard Magazine, Laurence J. Gillis wrote from Rye, NH, that after closing his law office last year, he began teaching on the Internet at New Hampshire College and "by the traditional 'chalk-and-talk' method at Hesser College." A budding author, he also had a piece published in the New York Times Magazine last March, entitled "The Fiber-Optic Confessional."

In the same issue, Robert D. Joffe, J.D. '67, reported that he was elected to the board of directors of Fiduciary Trust International, the investment-management firm, in July. He is presiding partner at Cravath, Swaine & and Moore.


A July 1999 update from Laurence J. Gillis adds the following.  have rejoined the ranks of the living, by becoming an assistant county attorney here in seacoast NH.  prosecute drunks and purse-snatchers. It's fun and there's no heavy lifting. My excursion into the lit'ry life was interesting.  enjoyed being published in the NY Times Magazine, inter alia, but the steady paycheck  now receive reads well in its own way. The paycheck doesn't say much, but what little it says is done with such panache! Bon apetit.


In June 1999 Laurence J. Gillis wrote futher as follows. My post-retirement excursion into "The Lit'ry Life" continues. I had a paid essay published in the New York Times Magazine a few months ago. It was well received. Please note that if your cash flow slows down a little, you should give the Times a call -- they pay serious money for stuff they publish!!. Also,  recommend adjunct teaching for any of my classmates who would like to talk at length and to get paid for it. For a retired trial lawyer like me, it's as though  have died and gone to Heaven.

The Hartford Courant ran a profile on George David of United Technologies Corp. recently. The article noted that he enjoys sailing and has plans to enter his sailboat, Idler, in the U.S. trials for the British Admiral's Cup competition this spring. He also serves as president of the Wadsworth Atheneum.

Laurence J. Gillis writes, “After 27 years as a trial attorney in New Hampshire and Massachusetts, I have closed my law office (voluntarily, but thanks for asking). I now teach legal subjects at New Hampshire College and Hesser College part-time. I do nonlegal work in Boston and use the rail commuting time from Newburyport to write the Great American Novel. If you wish to volunteer for a role in the book, please drop me a line at .”

John Pitman Weber celebrated 10 years of print-making with a winter show at Taller Mestizarte in Chicago. His book on the contemporary mural movement, Toward a People's Art (University of New Mexico Press, 1998), first published in 1977, has also been reissued in a new edition that brings it up to date. He continues to be active in the Chicago Public Art Group and teaches at Elmhurst College.



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