Harvard-Radcliffe Class of 1964

Obituaries

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The first section below contains an index to the names of all deceased classmates. When a full-text obituary is included in the second section, the name in the index will be a link to that text.

I have now added to the index all of the names that are in the class memorial list. The obituaries are up-to-date as of May 12, 2014. Four of our classmates, who died since the Fiftieth Anniversary Report came out, have not yet had obituaries submitted to Harvard.


INDEX OF NAMES

Susan Jane Ackerman David Allen Alldritt Peter Brooks Ardery
Mehmet Kanik Aricanli Dorothy Elizabeth Balogh Joseph Edward Barton
Janis Baumanis Judith Beach Goodenough Jerome Frank Beekman
Kate Louis Bernstein Martin Alfred Berwick III Jonathan Worth Bingham
Rodney Nelson Blatherwick William C. Bond Reginald Bradlee II
Robert Edward Bradley Elliot Maynard Brener Philip Joseph Rogers Brickman
Winston Perry Bullard Gary Dale Byrd John Edward Cawthorne
Derek Thomas Clawson James Henry Clifford III George Murray Cohen
John Randolph Coleman III Mary Margaret Comer Andrew Davenport Cook
Donald Ray Cook Jonathan Boyd Cook Lawrence Jay Corwin
Margaret Cosler Thompson Abigail Crear John Michael Crichton
James Albert Culpepper Timothy Borton Dailey James Paul Dallmann
Jacqueline Rose Daly William Michael Daly Richard Gordon Darman
Penelope Davis Hart David de Barsy de Give John White Delaney
Morris Edward Director Frances Dittmann Craig Anne Dorr Smith
Samuel Smith Drury, Jr. David Arch Dunlap Constance Ross Dupee Hsia
Michael Dwinell Jonathan Eberhart Howard J. Eisen
William Emerson Jeannette Louise Faurot Joel Feigenbaum
Michael Edward Fein Frederick Douglas Fields Edward Harry Flitton III
Jeffrey Raymond Forbes David Lewis Freeman Thomas Stanley Freeman
Eric Gale Friberg Samuel Liberty Harvey Fuller Sondra "Sunny" Gamow Goldenfarb
Molly Theodora Geraghty Dorothy Giles Souvaine David Barry Poliakoff Goodman
Louis Seth Goodman Joel Harvey Gordon Quentin Anthony Gordon
William Anthony Grana William Barton Gray Stanley Alan Greenblatt
Diane Greene Ronald James Greene Nancy Griffin Jackson
Charles Edward Gunnoe Felicia Hance Stewart Kenneth George Hancock
Ralph Warner Harbison II Walter Warren Harp David Harris
Edmund Arthur Hennessy Richard Allan Hirsch Daniel Bingham Hobbing
James Frederic Holt Donald Cowger Hooper Roger Brooke Hopkins III
Charles Edmund Horman Charles Thomas Huggins Forney Hutchinson III
Robert David Joffe Chase William Johnson Lorella Margaret Jones
Richard Preston Jones Daniel Norman Kalikow Cyrus Anthony Kamundia
Joseph Ronald Kendler T. Frederick Kenny II Eugene Kinasewich
Jonathan Donald Kramer Allen Lloyd Kyle Jeffrey Louis Lambert
Anthony Walker Lecompte Frederick Keith Lenherr Leslie Lessinger
Alexander Arthur Levin Paul Arnold Levin Roger Bert Levin
Thomas Edward Phillips Levin Alison Liebhafsky Des Forges William Hardy Lloyd
Katherine Jean Lubart Andrew Charles Luther, Jr. James Francis Lynch, Jr.
John Alan Mahaney Richard Arlyn Marks Richard Allen Mather
Charles Eliot McClennen David Koch McMullen Mary Helen McPeek Callahan
James Stephen Merrill Dean Bryant Mitchell Gerry Foster Molina
Francis Lockwood Morris Jerry Joseph Mrizek Lawrence George Mullen II
Helen Jean Newman Soll Christian Luger Ohiri Jan Sterling Palmer
Eleanor Hortense Pearson Bruce Herbert Pecheur Bradford Kent Perry
Warren Alan Petersen Iver Echart Peterson Eric William Petraske
Eugenia Rose Plunkett Thomas Walter Pohl Thomas Joseph Porter
Yvonne Quinlan Daniel Mooar Radcliffe Stephen James Rallis
Archibald James Reark Robert Matthew Reidy John Alden Rice
Anne Maureen Richardson Anthony Richard Riolo Leslie Allen Riseberg
David John Rittenhouse Russell Brewster Roberts Hugh Dunbar Robertson
Robert Emmett Robertson III Marilyn Robinson Waldman Peter Warren Rodman
Thomas Edward Sanderson Ronald William Sandven George Lee Sargent, Jr.
Olivia Schieffelin Nordberg Stephen Adatto Schlesinger George Lewis Selden
Eleanor Clark "Mimi" Sinkler Thomas Victor Siporin Robert Nathan Sollod
Adam Nathaniel Steinberg Lionel Maximilian Stern III Joseph John Stetz, Jr.
George Peter Stokes David Lewis Stone Joseph Suydam Stout, Jr.
Willard Arnold Sullivan, Jr. Thomas Joseph Swan, Jr. John Nicholson Talbot
Ivan Alexandrovitch Tcherepnin Thomas David Tews Stephen Naylor Thomas
Nancy Tilley Snyder David Robinson Timrud John Livingstone Tollack
Richard Miller Travis Nancy Elisabeth Trumbull Peter Andreas Tscherning
Harry Vincent Turner Casey Allen Underhill John Charles Voosen
John Anthony Drummond Walker Walter Andrews "Rufus" Wanning David Reid Ward
Peter Jack Warshall Michael Wechsler James Ronald Weir
Justin Lawrence Wells Francis Abeken Westbrook Anthony Eaton Weymouth
Marjorie Kitchel Whallon Noble Thomas Dow Wickens Woodward Adams Wickham, Jr.
Laidlaw Bosworth "Boz" Williams Louis Gerry Williams Douglas Boris Wolf
Susan Woodward Fine Jared Leonard Wright Judith Ling-Shih Yee



OBITUARIES

SUSAN JANE ACKERMAN died September 19, 2003, in Concord, Massachusetts. She was born October 10, 1941, in Utica, New York, and attended the School of the Holy Child, in Suffern. A resident of North House (Comstock) at Radcliffe, she received her A.B. degree cum laude. She was a former vice president of strategic planning and research for Grey Advertising, Inc., in New York City, where she lived for some twentyfive years. In 1989 she started her own marketing consultancy in Philadelphia, and in 1997 she moved to the Chicago area as vice president for analytic services with The NPD Group, Inc., a marketing research firm. She is listed in Who's Who in American Women and Who's Who in Advertising. She was survived by her mother and stepfather, Annette and Harold Cutler, and a sister, Sally Eaton..

DAVID ALAN ALLDRITT died June 5, 2008, in Wichita, Kansas. He was a Wichita entrepreneur and the owner of a business that provided services to the aerospace companies in the region. He was an active volunteer in the Wichita community and a passionate supporter of youth athletics. He leaves his wife, M. Kay (Brinnon), a daughter, M. Megan '93, and two sons, M. Drayton '84 and Barry.

PETER BROOKS ARDERY died July 15, 1974, at Bombay, India. The son of Philip Pendleton Ardery, LL.B. '38, he was born April 2, 1943, in San Angelo, Texas. He prepared at Louisville Country Day School, Louisville, Kentucky, and received his AB from Harvard in 1964. A resident of Adams House, he belonged to Hasty Pudding and the Delphic Club. After graduation Peter Ardery entered the National Guard for six months of active duty and then moved to New York City to work for the Paris Review, where he became managing editor. During this time he was also co-editor with George Plimpton of three volumes of the American Literary Anthology. In the fall of 1972 he returned to Harvard as a special student to take pre-medical courses, and the following fall entered the University of Kentucky Medical School where he was made vice-president of his class. He died while traveling in India in July 1974, after completing his second year of medical school.

MEHMET KANIK ARICANLI died May 9, 2005, in Istanbul, Turkey. He was born February 23, 1941, in Izmir, Turkey, the son of Ahmet Munir and Piraye Aricanli. He attended Ankara Koleji until 1957, when he emigrated to the United States, and graduated from Madison High School in Portland, Oregon. A member of Dudley House while at Harvard, he received his AB in 1964. After graduation he joined the travel industry, first working for an international airline and then cofounding, with his wife, Dilek, a travel service in Istanbul, Bayram Tours. He also did a stint in the Turkish army. He completed an MBA at New York University in 1982 and spent some years in financial services in New York in the years following, working as an investment adviser with Ari Asset Management. In 1988 he returned to Turkey and the travel business, becoming managing director of an Istanbul agency, Active Tourism. He was survived by three daughters, Zeynep, Gulnaz, MBA '92, and Sumru; a son, Kutlu; two brothers, Abidin Ülkü and Tosun, PhD '76; and eight grandchildren.

DOROTHY ELIZABETH BALOGH died April 7,1984, at Washington, DC. The daughter of Elemer T. and Dora Balogh, she was born February 10, 1942 in Budapest, Hungary. After receiving her AB, cum laude, with our Class, Balogh studied in Europe for two years, at the University of Munich and the University of Madrid. She worked for a year in Vienna, Austria, and then returned to New York to enter a Master's program at Columbia University. Balogh worked for the United Nations, first as a documents analyst, and then as an industrial information officer with the U.N. Industrial Development Organization in Vienna.

JOSEPH EDWARD BARTON died September 9, 2002, in Boston. He was born June 3, 1942, in Lawrence, Massachusetts, and grew up in Andover. He lived in Adams House and lettered in lacrosse at Harvard. After graduation he joined the Peace Corps, serving in Colombia as a teacher and unemployment counselor and helping to build health centers. On returning to Boston he made several independent film documentaries and then put his filmmaking in the service of the unemployed, helping Chelsea residents find work by taping mock job interviews and advising them on their interviewing skills. He also served as an advocate for Spanish-speaking patients at hospitals in the Boston area. During the 1980s he became a systems architect for Fidelity Investments. A longtime community activist, he was former president of the Fenway Civic Organization and chairman of the Fenway Planning Task Force. He was a skilled gardener with a fondness for dancing and Latin music. He was survived by his wife, Jennifer Jones, a sister, Anne, and a brother, David.

JANIS BAUMANIS died February 22, 1968, at Montreal, Quebec, Canada. The son of Juris Augusts and Olga (Grivins) Baumanis, he was born December 8, 1942, at Valmiera, Latvia. He prepared at Calvin M. Woodward High School, Toledo, Ohio, before coming to Harvard where he received an AB, cum laude, with our Class. While at Harvard he lived in Winthrop House, and was a member of the Phillips Brooks House and the Young Republican Club.

JUDITH BEACH GOODENOUGH died on September 18, 1990, in Fox Chapel, Pennnsylvania. She was born on October 25, 1942, in Berea, KY. She prepared at Birch Wathen School in New York City. She received an AB, cum laude, in 1964 with our Class. Judith Goodenough had published more than 700 poems in 300 journals since 1978. Her first collection of poems, Dower Land, was published in 1984. Her second book, Milking in November (St. Andrews Press), was published in 1990, and Bury the Blackbird Here, in 1991. She was also a song writer whose work has been recorded on folk labels in the U.S. and in Ireland by Gordon Bok, Tommy Makem, Liam Clancy, and other artists. She was survived by her husband, John B., and her two daughters, Anne and Elizabeth.

JEROME FRANK BEEKMAN died October 30, 1997. The son of Frank Jerome and Sarah K. (Siddens) Beckman, he was born September 27, 1942, in St. Louis, Missouri. He prepared at Belleville High School, Belleville, Illinois. A resident of Dunster House, he received an AB in 1964 as of our Class. After graduation, he studied internal medicine at the University of Rochester where he earned an M.D. in 1968. Dr. Beekman went on to complete his internship and residency at Georgetown University Hospital. Following his training at Georgetown, Dr. Beekman moved to Fort Huachuca, Arizona, where he served as an Army physician until 1977. He then accepted a dual position as chief of the pulmonary disease center and as director of the pulmonary fellowship at the Madigan Army Medical Center in Tacoma, Washington. In 1982, Dr. Beckman left the Army, but continued to focus on pulmonary disease on behalf of the Group Health Cooperative of Puget Sound and, by the time of our Twenty-fifth Anniversaty, had become its associate medical director. Three years later, he was named that organization's chief of staff. Dr. Beckman was a fellow of the American College of Physicians, the American College of Chest Physicians, and the American Academy of Medical Directors as well as a clinical associate professor of medicine at the University of Washington School of Medicine. Dr. Beckman was survived by his wife, Susan (Smith), whom he married on November 29, 1969; his daughter, Catherine Laurel; his son, John Stuart; his mother; and a sister, Sarah Wolf.

KATE LOUIS BERNSTEIN died April 7, 2006. She was a scientist who loved growing roses. Her survivors include a sister, Anne '67.

MARTIN ALFRED BERWICK III died March 30, 2008, in Lewiston, Maine. He enjoyed a long career as a research chemist and later a vice president with Eastman Kodak Co., in Rochester, New York. He was active in his community as a Boy Scout leader and soccer coach, and after retiring in 1999 he became a master gardener, year after year growing far more vegetables than his friends and family could ever consume. He was an air force veteran. He leaves two sons, Neal and Daniel, his parents, Jacqueline and Alfred, a sister, Sandra Crowley, and a brother, Christopher; his wife, Kathleen (Neville), died in 2003.

JONATHAN WORTH BINGHAM died March 7, 1964, at Glenview, Kentucky. The son of George Barry Bingham, '28, and Mary (Caperton) Bingham, he was born June 1, 1942, at Louisville, Kentucky. He prepared at the Brooks School in North Andover, Massachusetts, before coming to Harvard where he spent three years with our Class. While at Harvard he resided in Adams House, and was a member of the Hasty Pudding Institute and the Gilbert and Sullivan Players. Bingham was survived by his parents and a brother, George Barry Bingham, Jr., who is a member of the Harvard Class of 1956.

RODNEY NELSON BLATHERWICK died June 14, 2010, in Chicago, Illinois. The son of Leonard and Helen Blatherwick, he was born in Chicago on March 3, 1942, and prepared at the Francis W. Parker School there. He was a Dunster House resident while at Harvard and received his AB in 1966. A lifelong resident of Chicago's Lincoln Park neighborhood, he lived in one of the city's oldest houses, built in the 1860s and spent his entire career at Northern Trust Bank, retiring as systems officer. He was a dedicated supporter of environmental causes and historic preservation. He was also an ardent fan of public transportation, especially railroads and rapid transit, and a lover of cats. He was survived by his wife of thirty-six years, Judy (Colohan).

WILLIAM CHARLES BOND of Austin, Texas, died March 6, 2011. He was born in Detroit, Michigan, on November 24, 1942, and attended Jackson (Michigan) High School. At Harvard he was a Winthrop House resident and member of the varsity swimming team and Pi Eta, receiving his AB in applied sciences with the Class in 1964. After completing an MBA at the University of Michigan in 1966, he served for two years in the army finance corps, including a tour of duty in Cam Ranh Bay, Vietnam. A certified public accountant, he then joined Arthur Andersen & Company, working for the accounting firm first in Detroit and later in Charles, Illinois. At his retirement he had his own information technology consulting business, Bond & Associates. He was survived by his wife of thirty-nine years, Sharon (Schuchardt).

REGINALD BRADLEE II, died in an automobile accident March 26, 1966, at Cambridge, Massachusetts. The son of Herbert Gardner Bradlee, '40, and Celena (Dean) Bradlee, he was born October 22, 1941, at Medford, Massachusetts. He prepared at Belmont Hill School, Belmont, Massachusetts, and attended Harvard with our Class. He resided in Kirkland House, and was treasurer of the Ski Club, an active member of Phillips Brooks House, and also a member of the Hasty Pudding and the Fox Club. After college he served in the Air Force for two years. He was survived by his parents.

ROBERT EDWARD BRADLEY died on June 5, 1993 at Braintree, Massachusetts. He was born on July 30, 1942, in Boston. He prepared at the Boston Latin School and attended Harvard from 1960 to 1964, where he was a resident of Adams House. He received an MA from the University of Massachusetts at Amherst and a J.D. from Suffolk University in 1973. At the time of his death, Bradley was a litigator for the firm of Ganick, O'Brien, and Sarin in Dorchester, Massachusetts. where he had worked for five years. He was a member of the Massachusetts and Norfolk County Bar Associations. He was survived by his wife, Ellen Flanagan, a daughter Kristen, and two sons, Ryan and Brendan.

ELLIOT MAYNARD BRENER died September 2, 2007, in Tucson, Arizona. He was born in Chicago, Illinois, on April 6, 1943, the son of Roy and Golda Brener, and attended Oak Park and River Forest (Illinois) High School. He lived in Dunster House and sang in the Glee Club while at Harvard, receiving his AB, magna cum laude, with the Class in 1964. He completed his PhD in psychology at Boston University in 1969. He enjoyed a thirty-four-year career as a clinical psychologist in California, concentrating his practice on adults with severe mental illnesses. A diver and hiker, world traveler, music lover, and awardwinning nature photographer, in 2003 he retired to Tucson, where he reveled in the beauty of the desert and mountains. He was survived by his wife, Barbara (Sinclair), whom he married in 1987; a daughter, Susan; a son, Steven; his mother; and a brother, David.

PHILIP JOSEPH ROGERS BRICKMAN died May 13, 1982, at Ann Arbor, Michigan. The son of Leo and Molly (Rogers) Brickman, he was born August 22, 1943, in Montreal, Quebec, Canada. Brickman prepared at Metuchen High School in Metuchen, New Jersey, and received his AB, magna cum laude, with our Class. After graduation, he attended the University of Michigan, where he earned a PhD in psychology. Brickman then spent ten years at Northwestern University in Evanston, Illinois, where he taught as a psychology professor and was the director of the graduate program in social psychology. Continuing on in his academic career, he moved to the University of Michigan as a professor and director of the Research Center for Group Dynamics. His survivors included his wife, the former Elizabeth Schaeffer, whom he married in 1966, and their three daughters: Rachel, Sarah, and Katharine.

WINSTON PERRY BULLARD died October 15, 1998, at Canton, Michigan. Mr. Bullard was born September 2, 1942, in Cleveland, Ohio. He received an AB in 1964, before serving in Vietnam from 1966 to 1967. A decorated Navy veteran, he later renounced his 13 medals at an antiwar rally. After leaving the Navy, Mr. Bullard received his J.D. from the University of Michigan at Ann Arbor. Shortly after law school, he won a seat as a Democrat in the Michigan State House of Representatives, where he served for 20 years, most of that time as chairman of the House Judiciary Committee, until retiring in 1992. During his political career, Mr. Bullard was an outspoken champion of civil liberties and sponsored 118 bills that were enacted into law, including sunshine laws opening government proceedings to the public, as well as a worker right-to-know law that guaranteed access to personnel files. Mr. Bullard was survived by his wife, Kelly, and a son, Nate.

GARY DALE BYRD died February 14, 1966, at Wichita, Kansas. The son of Gail Rolland and Irma (Pancake) Byrd, he was born June 26, 1942, at Haddam, Kansas. He prepared for college at Wichita High School, East, and at Harvard received an AB in 1964. Gary was a resident of Lowell House, and a member of the Student Council, the Young Democratic Club, and the Outing Club. He was active in the Lowell House sports program in football, basketball, fencing, cross country, and baseball. Before he died he was a graduate teaching fellow at Wichita State University and was studying for a Master's degree in political science. He was survived by his parents.

JOHN EDWARD CAWTHORNE died of cancer on August 14, 2012, in Boston, Massachusetts. He was born February 19, 1942, in Tulsa, Oklahoma, and graduated from Ulysses S. Grant High School in Portland, Oregon. A Kirkland House resident, he was a member of the varsity track team while at Harvard and received his AB, cum laude in government, in 1964. He went on to earn an MAT at Antioch College in 1969. He taught at every level in the course of his career, from kindergarten through graduate school, beginning as a high school history teacher in Washington, DC, and then principal of an experimental school in Boston's Dorchester neighborhood. He spent more than a decade as a researcher for Educational Development Corporation (EDC) in Newton, Massachusetts. A scholar of urban education, he joined Boston College in 1988 as a researcher and retired in 2011 as associate dean of students and outreach in the Lynch School of Education. He was a veteran of the civil rights movement of the 1960s, having helped register voters in Mississippi and taken part in the Poor People's Campaign of Martin Luther King, Jr. He was a former vice president for education in the National Urban League and served as a program coordinator for the Metropolitan Council for Education Opportunity in Boston. In Brookline, Massachusetts, where he lived and coached youth sports for many years, he cofounded Concerned Black Citizens of Brookline, a group that lobbied for equality in the public schools. In 2003 the Lynch School at Boston College established the John E. Cawthorne Chair in Teacher Education for Urban Schools. After retiring, he volunteered in the Brookline schools as a classroom aide and continued his yearly tradition of driving a van full of BC students to deliver books, supplies, and a lending hand to the Holy Family School in Natchez, Mississippi. He was survived by his wife, LaVerne (Simms); a daughter, Maya Eeson; two sons, Malcolm and Langston; a sister, Elsa Connor; a brother, Herbert; and three grandchildren.

DEREK THOMAS CLAWSON of Bloomfield, New York, died March 11, 2004. He was born July 3, 1942, in Mineola, New York, and graduated from Washington Township (Ohio) High School. A Dudley House member and WHRB staffer while at Harvard, he served in the navy from 1962 to 1966 in the Arctic and Antarctic and received his A.B., magna cum laude, in 1969. He completed an MA in clinical psychology at the University of Rochester in 1974. He worked for many years as a psychologist in the forensic unit of the Monroe Developmental Center in Rochester, a facility of the New York State Office of Mental Retardation and Developmental Disabilities, where he devoted his career to evaluating and treating developmentally disabled sexual offenders. He also ran an antiques business in East Bloomfield, on the side. The Class has no current information about his surviving family, but his entry in the Thirty-fifth Report listed a wife, Linda (Freeman), whom he married in 1982; a daughter, Bridget; and two sons, Phillip and Christopher.

JAMES HENRY CLIFFORD III died May 8, 2001, in Beverly, Massachusetts. He was born March 17, 1942, and grew up in Rye Beach, New Hampshire, graduating from Phillips-Andover Academy. At Harvard he was a resident of Leverett House. He received his medical degree from the University of Rochester in 1967 and interned in internal medicine at Boston City Hospital. After two years in the air force, he completed his medical training at the Medical Center Hospital of the University of Vermont. He was a longtime member of the medical staff and former chief of medicine at Beverly Hospital and also served as medical director of Beverly Nursing Home and of the Lahey Clinic facilities in Beverly, Danvers, and Ipswich. A resident of Manchester-by-the-Sea for twenty-six years, he loved the ocean all his life, and enjoyed swimming, body surfing, gardening, tennis, and history. He was survived by his wife, Gail (Tosi), three daughters, Lisa, Christina Comparato, and Julie Smail, his mother, Josephine, and three brothers, John, Thomas, and William.

GEORGE MURRAY COHEN died May 16, 2002, in Edison, New Jersey. He was born in Boston on March 9, 1943, and attended Boston Latin School. He was a member of the Harvard-Radcliffe Orchestra and a resident of Quincy House while at the College. He went on to earn a master's degree in English at Northwestern University and another in mathematics education at Rutgers University. He taught mathematics at Rutgers Prep and Essex County VoTech before joining the faculty of Orange High School in 2000. He played the cello in the Plainfield Symphony for many years. He had been a resident of Metuchen since 1971. He was survived by his wife, Margaret (Heyman), three sons, Daniel '97, Jonathan, and Aaron, and a half-brother, Norman Weitzner.

JOHN RANDOLPH COLEMAN III died April 4, 1967, at Princeton, New Jersey. He was born March 1, 1943, in Washington, DC, the son of John Randolph, Jr., and Enid (Anderson) Coleman. He prepared at St. Paul's School, Concord, New Hampshire, and at Harvard received an AB, magna cum laude, in 1964. While at Harvard, Randy resided in Dunster House and was a member of the Hasty Pudding Institute and Phoenix S-K Club. He was also on the freshman and varsity tennis teams. After graduation he spent a year studying in Bonn, West Germany, on a Fulbright grant before coming to Princeton, where he was studying art and archeology. He was survived by his parents.

MARY MARGARET COMER died on October 25, 1992, in Worcester, Massachusetts. She was born on September 11, 1942, in Jacksonville, Florida. She prepared at Savannah Country Day School, Savannah, Georgia. Comer received an AB in 1964 with our Class and a PhD from Purdue University in 1972. She did postgraduate work at the University of Wisconsin, Madison, and at the University of Regensburg, Germany. She had taught biology at Clark University since 1976. Just before her death she had returned from spending a year doing research in molecular genetics in Paris. She was a member of the American Association for the Advancement of Science and the American Society for Microbiology. She had published various journal articles on her research. Comer was killed when she interrupted a burglary in her house.

ANDREW DAVENPORT COOK died January 7, 1969, at Edgemont, Pennsylvania. The son of Henry Wireman, Jr., and Louise (Marckwald) Cook, he was born June 20, 1942, in Minneapolis, Minnesota. He prepared at The Haverford School, Haverford, Pennsylvania, before coming to Harvard where he received an AB in 1964. Cook was a newspaper reporter in Trenton, New Jersey, at the time of his death.

DONALD RAY COOK of Wichita, Kansas, died November 7, 2012. He was born November 16, 1942, in Bessemer, Alabama, and attended Holmes High School in Covington, Kentucky. During his two years with the Class he lived in Quincy House and sang with the Krokodiloes and the Glee Club. He transferred after sophomore year to Southern Nazarene University in Bethany, Oklahoma, receiving a BS in 1964, and in 1971 completed an MD at the University of Kentucky. He practiced family medicine in Wichita for many years and was a past president of the Kansas Academy of Family Physicians. He continued to enjoy singing and playing the trombone throughout his life and was active in alumni activities of the Harvard Glee Club. At the time of the Forty-fifth Anniversary Report he listed a wife of forty-five years, Delia (Jones); a daughter, Candace Brown; and a son, Chad; in his Fortieth entry he also listed two grandsons.

JONATHAN BOYD COOK died on December 26, 1992, at Washington, DC. He was born on May 26, 1942, in Minneapolis, MN. He prepared at Teaneck High School in New Jersey. At Harvard, Cook was a resident of Kirkland House. His concentration was in social relations. He received an AB, magna cum laude, in 1964 with our Class and a JD in 1967. In the 25th Report, Cook wrote that he was National Executive Director of Support Centers of America, an organization for management assistance and training for nonprofit organizations. He had published many articles on planning in nonprofit organizations.

LAWRENCE JAY CORWIN died on March 19, 1992. He was born on January 20, 1943, in East Orange, New Jersey. He prepared at Teaneck High School in New Jersey. At Harvard, he was a resident of Winthrop House. His concentration was in mathematics. He received an AB, summa cum laude, in 1964 with our Class, an AM in 1965, and a PhD in 1968. In the 25th Report, Corwin wrote that he was a professor of mathematics at Rutgers University and Associate Provost for the Mathematical and Physical Sciences and that he was a member of the American Mathematical Society, Mathematical Association of America, and the American Association for the Advancement of Science. He had published more than fifty articles, mainly in math journals. He was survived by his wife, Amy Cohen, and his son Nathan.

MARGARET COSLER THOMPSON died January 26, 2004, in Washington, DC. She worked as an editor and writer for the American Council of the Blind. She leaves a daughter, Kim, a son, Michael, and two sisters, Nancy Edwards and Anne Trovinger.

JOHN MICHAEL CRICHTON died November 1, 2008, in Los Angeles, California. He was born in Chicago, Illinois, on October 23, 1942, and attended Roslyn (New York) High School. During his Harvard years he lived in Lowell House and was a member of the basketball team, Crimson staff, Hasty Pudding, and Phi Beta Kappa. He received his AB in anthropology, summa cum laude, with the Class in 1964 and, after a year on a teaching fellowship at the University of Cambridge, his MD from the Medical School in 1969. By that time, however, he had decided to be a writer, not a doctor. His 1968 medical thriller A Case of Need, published under the pen name Jeffery Hudson, had already won an Edgar Allen Poe Award from the Mystery Writers of America, and had been followed by The Andromeda Strain (1969), his first best seller and the first of several that became successful Hollywood movies. He went on to become a towering presence in the worlds of publishing and filmmaking, with such novels as The Great Train Robbery, Congo, Jurassic Park, Rising Sun, and Coma. He made his feature-film directing debut in 1973 with Westworld, and directed five other movies during the 1970s and '80s, including Coma. He cowrote the screenplay for Jurassic Park, the 1993 blockbuster directed by Steven Spielberg, and for Twister (1996), and created the award-winning NBC medical drama ER, which ran from 1994 to 2009. He also wrote some nonfiction, notably Jasper Johns (1977), a portrait of the artist, and Electronic Life, about information technology (1983), and in 1995 shared an Academy Award for technical achievement for pioneering the computerization of motion picture budgeting and scheduling. He was married five times; his survivors included his wife, Sherri Alexander; a daughter, Taylor; and a Harvard sister and brother, Kimberly '67 and Douglas '70.

JAMES ALBERT CULPEPPER died February 23, 2003, in Tallahassee, Florida. He was born September 3, 1942, in Tallahassee, where he attended Leon High School. At Harvard he was a resident of Quincy House and a member of Phillips Brooks House, receiving his A.B. cum laude. He completed an LL.B. at Stanford University in 1967 and lived for thirty-eight years in Palo Alto, California, before returning to his hometown. He was a private investor, community activist, musician, and philanthropist. He was the founder and past president of the Darwin Society of Saint Theresa and a board member of the Gulf Specimen Marine Laboratory, in Panacea, Florida. He was survived by his wife, Kathryne (Lamb), a daughter, Elizabeth, a son, Jack, two sisters, Mary Luce and Ambers Barry, and a brother, Jack.

TIMOTHY BORTON DAILEY died April 15, 1991, at Apple Valley, California. He was born March 23, 1943, in Hartford, CT, the son of James Albert and Frances Wallace (Horton) Dailey. He prepared at Burlington High School, Burlington, Vermont, receiving the Harvard Club Award junior year, before entering Harvard where he received an AB, cum laude, with our Class. In New York he studied at Union Theological Seminary, did alternative service as a conscientious objector with the New York City Welfare Department, and was a social worker at the Graham Home for Children. He received a PhD in sociology from the University of Massachusetts at Amherst in 1975 and taught criminology and criminal justice at Ohio State University and at Clarkson College, where he edited White-Collar and Economic Crime with Peter Wickman. Leaving academic life in 1980, he worked in advertising and then in the moving business. At the time of his death, from a highway accident in the Mojave Desert, he was an owner/operator associated with North American Van Lines. His marriage in 1966 to Anne Titus Bostwick ended in divorce. He was survived by his second wife, Irene Carol (Allen), whom he married in 1978; their children, Alison Irene and Evan Timothy; his mother; a brother, Wallace Finley '62, AM '63; and a sister, Sarah Elizabeth D. Kuzmanoff.

JAMES PAUL DALLMANN died September 9, 1986, at Weston, Massachusetts. He was born October 22, 1942, in Litchfield, MN, and attended Dassel High School, Dassel, MN. A resident of Winthrop House, he received his AB, magna cum laude. At Harvard, James Dallmann's field of concentration was history. He was a member of Phillips Brooks House. Dallmann had worked as a computer programmer and as an accountant and bookkeeper for the Weston Veterinary Clinic. At the time of his death, Dallmann had taught at the Fessenden School in Newton for fourteen years. Dallman was survived by his parents Raymond and Dorothy (Paulson) Dallmann of Dassel, Minnesota, and his brother, Rev. Gary Dallmann of Great Lakes, Illinois.

JACQUELINE ROSE DALY died September 2, 2010, in Cambridge, Massachusetts. She was born April 10, 1929. A member of St. Paul Church while at Radcliffe, she lived in South House and concentrated in philosophy, receiving her AB in 1964. In 1970 she completed an STB at Pontificia Universitŕ Gregoriana, in Rome. The Class has no information about her later life. She was survived by three sisters, Marie, Lynn, and Laura Pallotta, and a brother, Alan.

WILLIAM MICHAEL DALY died August 7, 2010, in Sherborn, Massachusetts. He was born December 31, 1942, in Asheville, North Carolina, the son of John and Anne Hooton Daly, and graduated from The Hill School, in Pottstown, Pennsylvania. A Winthrop House resident and member of the Hasty Pudding while at Harvard, he received his AB in English with the Class in 1964. After graduation he joined the staff of MIT's Instrumentation Laboratory, in Cambridge, where he worked on the digital simulation of the onboard flight software for the Apollo project. He left MIT in 1978 to become an independent consultant, initially involved in developing computer language for Olivetti and Fiat in Italy and later in developing trading systems in foreign exchange and money markets in New York, Copenhagen, London, Tokyo, and Hong Kong. Fluent in Italian and conversant in French and German, he loved to travel. He was a connoisseur of fine wines, had a penchant for cooking elaborate dishes, and was known nationally as a top-ranked trivia expert; he read books on algebra for pleasure and had a particular fascination with pi. He was survived by his wife of forty years, Carolyn (Gillis); two daughters, Lauren Grinberg and Elizabeth; a son, Alex; two sisters, Cathorne Williams and Marian Keating; and two grandchildren.

RICHARD GORDON DARMAN died January 25, 2008. He was a high-level bureaucrat and adviser in the administrations of four US presidents, beginning with that of Richard M. Nixon, under whom he was deputy assistant secretary of health, education, and welfare. Later a protégé of attorney general Elliott L. Richardson '41, LLB '44, LLD '71, in October 1973 he was a casualty of the so-called Saturday Night Massacre, in which Richardson and members of his senior staff resigned rather than comply with Nixon's order to fire Watergate special prosecutor Archibald Cox '34, LLB '37, LLD '75. He coached Ronald Reagan for his debate with Jimmy Carter and, after the election, became executive director of the Reagan transition team and then principal deputy to White House chief of staff James Baker. He moved to the Treasury with Baker, where, as deputy secretary, he was a major strategist behind the Tax Reform Act of 1986; later, as budget director under George H.W. Bush, he played a key role in persuading the president to renege on his "no new taxes" pledge, incurring the wrath of many fellow Republicans, who blamed him for Bush's defeat in 1992. At his death he was senior adviser to the Carlyle Group, a private-equity investment firm in Washington, DC, and chairman of AES Corp., an electric utility based in Arlington, Virginia. He leaves his wife, Kathleen Emmet '64, three sons, William '98, MPP '02, Jonathan '03, and Christopher, his mother, Eleanor, a sister, Lynn, and a brother, John '72, MBA '76.

PENELOPE DAVIS HART died February 27, 2001, in Lexington, Massachusetts. An artist, she maintained a studio at the Munroe Center for the Arts and was a member of the Depot Square Artists Gallery. She also taught at the Beth El Temple nursery school in Belmont. Active in Lexington community affairs, she served on the boards of the Council for the Arts and the Friends Community Residence and played the clarinet in several local groups, including the Lexington Town Band, the Arlington Philharmonic, and the Sudbury Savoyards. She leaves her husband, Timothy, a daughter, Melissa, two sons, Christopher and Nicholas, and a sister, Joan Baekeland.

DAVID DE BARSY DE GIVE died June 7, 2009, in Delaplane, Virginia. He was born in New York City on January 17, 1943, the son of Eleanor Hoguet de Give and Paul de Barsy de Give '34, and prepared at Portsmouth Priory School, in Portsmouth, Rhode Island. He lived in Eliot House and belonged to the Hasty Pudding while at Harvard and received his A.B. with the Class in 1964. He served in the coast guard and worked at Uniroyal, Inc., after graduation and completed an M.B.A. at New York University in 1971. He then joined Chemical Bank in New York City, where he remained for sixteen years, the last five as head of funding in the Capital Markets Group. In 1986 he made a bold shift to entrepreneurship, purchasing a ninety-one-acre cattle farm in northern Virginia and founding Newmarket Capital Group, in Fairfax. Over the next two decades he raised a pure-bred Angus herd at Belle Grove, his historic farm in Fauquier County, while becoming founding director and senior vice president of Southern Financial Bank, in Warrenton. He retired in 2004. He was an avid runner. He leaves his wife, of thirty-three years, Josephine "Jolly" (Fisher) '65; two sisters, Ghislaine '69 and Dominique '77; and two brothers, Paul '69 and Philip.

JOHN WHITE DELANEY died of cancer on July 30, 2010, in Dedham, Massachusetts. He was born February 28, 1943, in Springfield, Massachusetts, where he attended West Springfield High School. While at Harvard he lived in Leverett House and was a member of St. Paul Church, receiving his AB, magna cum laude in government, with the Class in 1964. He earned his JD from Harvard Law School in 1967. He was a partner in the Boston law firm of Hale and Dorr (now WilmerHale) who felt there was no higher calling than service of the public good. He was elected a town meeting member in West Springfield and served as moderator at the tender age of twenty-nine. A Republican, he was deputy assistant attorney general under Elliot Richardson '41, LLB '44, LLD '71, before taking up the post of assistant legislative secretary to Massachusetts governor Francis W. Sargent. He also was an assistant secretary of consumer affairs under both Governor Sargent and his Democratic successor, Michael S. Dukakis, LLB '60. He became executive director of the Boston Municipal Research Bureau in 1976. During the 1980s he was director of public affairs for Bank of Boston. He found time to volunteer in myriad organizations outside of work as well, from The Trustees of Reservations to the Massachusetts Taxpayers Foundation to the Robert F. Kennedy Action Corps, a child welfare nonprofit that he served as president from 1978 to 1981. Respected by one and all for his integrity and sound judgment, in the 1980s he was secretary of the Vault, a private committee of Boston's top business leaders that met to discuss public policy issues. He was a director of the New England Legal Foundation and an elected member of the Boston Bar Association Council. He held a special love for Harvard College, serving peerlessly for many years as the secretary of the Class of 1964. He cherished summers with his family on Martha's Vineyard and was a lifelong, fervent Red Sox fan. He was survived by his wife of thirty-five years, Betsey (Secor); two daughters, Erin '98 and Elizabeth; and a foster brother, Mark Chapman.

MORRIS EDWARD DIRECTOR died November 26, 1981, at Boston, Massachusetts. The son of Harry and Theresa (Barron) Director, he was born July 6, 1942, in Boston, Massachusetts. Director prepared at Cambridge High and Latin School before coming to Harvard with our Class and receiving his AB. He earned his MEd from Boston University in 1966. Director taught science in the Ridgefield and the Trumbull, Connecticut, public school systems. In 1972, he accepted the chairmanship of the science department of the Silver Lake Regional High School in Kingston, Massachusetts, and later became the science coordinator for the Silver Lake Regional School District. He also served on the board of directors of the Massachusetts Association of Science Teachers. His survivors included his wife, the former Marjorie Grace, whom he married in 1964, and a son, Scott.

FRANCES DITTMANN CRAIG died June 20, 1966. The daughter of Matthew and Frances Dittmann of Wynnewood, Pennsylvania, she prepared at the Shipley School in Bryn Mawr, Pennsylvania. A resident of North House, she concentrated on French history and literature and received an AB cum laude in 1964. She was a member of Freshman Chorus and Radcliffe Choral. In September 1964, she was married to John C. Craig, Jr.

ANNE DORR SMITH died October 28, 2005, in Cambridge, Massachusetts. Born in Cambridge on June 21, 1935, she prepared at the Winsor School, in Boston. She matriculated at Radcliffe in 1953, residing in South House, and received her AB in English, cum laude, in 1964. She went on to study painting under Olga Sears and sculpture under George Demetrios and Peter Abate. She was an award-winning sculptor whose work, mostly bronzes, was known throughout New England. She also taught English, art, and horsemanship to Boston's inner-city youth. She was twice president of the New England Sculptors Association. Early in her career, she played the guitar and performed as a folk singer at the Café Yana in Boston. She was survived by her husband, James, BArch '62; two sons, Alexander and Jonathan Wells; two stepchildren, Christine and Michael Smith; two sisters, Hester Swain and Ellen Thayer; and five grandchildren.

SAMUEL SMITH DRURY, JR. died November 28, 1982, at Croton-on-Hudson, New York. The son of Samuel Smith Drury, '35, and Hope (Blanchard) Drury, he was born September 5,1941, in Boston, Massachusetts. Drury prepared at St. Paul's School in Concord, New Hampshire, and received his AB with our Class. Immediately after graduation, he entered the banking profession as a credit officer and assistant manager before becoming a training officer with the Wells Fargo Bank of San Francisco. Drury accepted the post of assistant vice-president and director of training in 1973 with New York's Morgan Guaranty Trust Company and later transferred as vice-president to the training and management development department of European American Bank. His survivors included his wife, the former Edith Tracy Keppel, whom he married in 1962, and two sons: Samuel, 3d, and Benjamin.

DAVID ARCH DUNLAP died March 15, 1978, at Hawthorne, New York, after a long illness. The son of William Gray Dunlap, he was born October 24, 1942, in St. Petersburg, Florida, prepared at Phillips Exeter Academy, Exeter, New Hampshire, and received his AB from Harvard in 1964. He was a resident of Kirkland House and a member of the Pi Eta Club. David graduated from the Stanford Business School in 1966, and worked in New York City for nearly ten years as a business analyst and corporate financial manager, principally for Continental Grain Company and ITT, traveling widely and participating in numerous international business matters. David married the former Emily Hopkins Tucker on November 9, 1968, and is survived by her and their son, David Alexander. David was an avid sailor, for many years sailing his sloop out of Wickford, Rhode Island, and was always generous in inviting friends to accompany him. After illness circumscribed his work and sailing activities, he remained vitally interested in his friends, and spent much of his energy renewing or maintaining his contacts with them. In his years at Harvard, David made many friends among his classmates, for whom his name and life will remain a warm and affectionate memory.

CONSTANCE ROSS DUPEE HSIA died March 2, 1998, at Boston, Massachusetts. The daughter of William Arthur and Constance (Turner) Dupee, she was born on April 21, 1942, in Boston. She attended both the Shore Country Day School and the Mary C. Wheeler School in Providence, Rhode Island, where she was awarded a scholarship by the Alliance Francaise for a summer of study in Paris. A resident of South House, Mrs. Hsia graduated from Radcliffe, cum laude, with our Class. Following graduation, Mrs. Hsia enrolled at Harvard's Graduate School of Design, where she earned an MArch in 1968. A chance encounter at a political rally provided Mrs. Hsia with her first independent renovation design project and this, in turn, led her to form her own architectural firm based in Cambridge, Massachusetts. During her career, Mrs. Hsia focused her work primarily on designing residential additions and renovation projects throughout the Boston area. An avid gardener, Mrs. Hsia was a long-time member of the Cambridge Plant and Garden Club, and had also served on both the conservation and national affairs committees of the Garden Club of America. An outspoken advocate for conservation issues, Mrs. Hsia often lobbied Congress and, in 1993, was awarded the Zone I Creative Leadership Award for her work on behalf of the environment. Among her other talents, Mrs. Hsia was a noted watercolorist and held her first solo exhibition at the Cambridge Public Library in 1997. Mrs. Hsia had served as chair of the Mid-Cambridge Neighborhood Conservation District Commission, was a member of the boards of the Cambridge Visiting Nurse Association and of Cambridge Hospice. Additionally, Mrs. Hsia was very involved in establishing Chilton House in Cambridge, which provides hospice care to terminally ill patients. She is survived by her husband, John, to whom she was married on December 19, 1970; her daughter, Sarah Chih-jen; her son, Jonathan Chih-I; her sister, Helen Burrage; her brother, William A. Dupee III; and her mother.

MICHAEL DWINELL died March 23, 2009, in Portland, Maine. Ordained into the Episcopal priesthood in 1968, he served the church for 35 years before joining a lay order, the Order of Christian Workers, and taking the name Brother Michael Simon. He served as a consultant to numerous parishes, religious organizations, and judicatories and supervised many clergymen in their professional work and spiritual growth. He was an author and poet whose books include Being Priest to One Another, God-Birthing, and, most recently, From Within the Heart of God. He leaves his wife, Deborah (Sykes), two daughters, Elise Kovas and Jennifer Scala, and a brother, Duncan '71.

JONATHAN EBERHART died February 18, 2003, in Washington, DC. He was born September 11, 1942, in Evanston, Illinois, and raised in Hastings-on-Hudson, New York. During his Harvard years he worked summers at the weekly magazine Science News, and after receiving his AB joined the staff as a writer. He ended up working there for more than thirty years; as space sciences editor, he covered the golden age of planetary exploration. In 1976 he won the joint science writing award of the American Association for the Advancement of Science and Westinghouse Corporation for his coverage of the Viking landings on Mars. A folk singer and songwriter, he was a fixture of the folk scene in Washington for many years, performing and recording with his group, Boarding Party. He also was a co-founder, in 1964, of the Folklore Society of Greater Washington and helped organize its popular annual summer festival. He left no immediate survivors.

HOWARD JAY EISEN died February 7, 1987, at Bethesda, Maryland. He was born July 3, 1942, Newark, New Jersey, and attended South Broward High School, Hollywood, Florida. A resident of Quincy House, he received his AB cum laude in 1964 and his MD cum laude in 1969. Howard Eisen's field of concentration at Harvard was physics. He was a member of Phillips Brooks House. After an internship and residency in medicine at Boston City Hospital, Eisen joined the National Institutes of Health as a research associate. At the time of the Twentieth Anniversary Report, Eisen was working in biological and medical research at N.I.H. He wrote that his work involved using recombinant DNA technology to study the genetic effects of carcinogens and environmental contaminants such as TCDD (dioxin). Eisen was survived by his wife, Laura Post, Radcliffe '66, whom he married on December 26, 1965, and by his children Michael '67, Jonathan '68, and Lisa '75

WILLIAM EMERSON died November 20, 1968, at Quang Nam, South Vietnam. The son of David Emerson '38, and Mary (Cochran) Emerson, he was born December  14, 1941, in Concord, Massachusetts. He prepared at Belmont Hill School, Belmont, Massachusetts, and at Harvard received an AB in 1965, as of our Class. He resided in Grays Hall and Dunster House during his undergraduate years and was a member of the Delphic Club and played freshman football and lacrosse. Bing was a captain in the Marine Corps and was killed in action when his helicopter was shot down. He was survived by his wife, the former Suzanne Robertson, of New Haven, Connecticut.

JEANNETTE FAUROT died on August 12, 2005. She was Professor Emeritus of Chinese of the University of Texas at Austin. Her uncle had been a missionary to China, and she chose to come to Harvard because it offered a Chinese studies major back in 1960. She obtained a MA and PhD from Berkeley right at the height of the anti-war movements in the late 1960s, and then headed the new Chinese Language and literature program at UT Austin. She retired in 2000 because of treatments for multiple myeloma, which was diagnosed in 1997 and which was the cause of her death.

JOEL FEIGENBAUM died of cancer on April 16, 2003, in Falmouth, Massachusetts. He was a mathematics professor at Cape Cod Community College. After his house in Sandwich was threatened by a fire at the nearby Massachusetts Military Reservation, in 1982, he became curious about the goings-on at the base; he researched public-health records to create a database that demonstrated elevated cancer rates in the area and embarked on a 20-year campaign to prod the federal government to close down the artillery range and clean up the site. The reservation was declared a Superfund site in 1989; the massive cleanup, begun in 1997, may cost as much as one billion dollars. He leaves a daughter, Rachel, his mother, Rae, and his companion, Mary Ann Mathews.

MICHAEL EDWARD FEIN died November 23, 2000, in Mountain View, California. He was an electrical engineer who held positions in several Silicon Valley firms after moving to California in the early 1970s. These included Spectra Physics, KLA, and Nellcor Oximetry Business, a division of Mallinckrodt Inc., where he had spent the past decade as manager of sensor research, and where the gallery of patents is named in his honor. He was a strong supporter of Ashoka, an international foundation to support social entrepreneurship, and Scholarships for South Africa. He leaves his wife, Marcia (Proctor), and a sister, Frances Loose.

FREDERICK DOUGLAS FIELDS died June 6, 1999. Several obituaries are compiled at this link. The following is the obituary that appeared in the San Francisco Chronicle.

Rick Fields, a respected journalist and leading authority on American Buddhism, died Sunday at his home in Fairfax, ending a four-year battle with lung cancer. He was 57.

Mr. Fields was the author of a half-dozen books, including "How the Swans Came to the Lake: A Narrative History of Buddhism in America," and served as an editor and regular contributor to many magazines, including Yoga Journal, New Age Journal and Tricycle The Buddhist Review.

Marin County writer Anne Lamott, who lives down the street, loved his "Zen hippie elegance,and the way Mr. Fields was both a wide-eyed boy and a grown-up man." Lamott devoted a chapter to her friend and neighbor in her recent best-seller, Traveling Mercies.

Mr. Fields was born Frederick Douglas Fields in New York City and was a track star at Andrew Jackson High School. His friend at Harvard University in 1964, Peter Warshall, recalled that Mr. Fields was "kicked out of Harvard for sleeping with a Radcliffe girl, off campus on a weekend." Warshall, who is now editor of Whole Earth magazine, said Mr. Fields "set the tone for a muscular American Buddhism."

Mr. Fields was an early instructor at the Naropa Institute's Jack Kerouac School of Disembodied Poetics, where he was an associate and friend of the school's co-founder, Allen Ginsberg. Tricycle magazine founder Helen Tworkov said Mr. Fields "came to terms with the fact that he would die, but he never accepted cancer."

"I don't have a life-threatening disease," he said in an interview in the fall of 1997, "I have a disease-threatening life."

He is survived by his wife, Marcia; his parents Allen and Reva Fields of Keene, N.H.; and his sisters Laura Jawitz of Madison, N.H., and Joanna Bogin, of New Hartford, Conn.

EDWARD HARRY FLITTON III died March 26, 2010, in Chicago, Illinois. He was born in Austin, Minnesota, on December 26, 1942, and graduated from Austin High School. He was a Leverett House resident while at Harvard and a drummer and bandleader in the Harvard Band, receiving his AB, cum laude in economics, in 1964. He earned a JD at the University of Chicago in 1967 and spent the next two years teaching commercial law at the University of Auckland, New Zealand. Later he practiced law in Colorado Springs. He joined the Colorado Springs firm of Spurgeon, Haney & Howbert in 1981 and was a leader in the negotiations preceding its merger with Holland & Hart in 1986. He remained at Holland & Hart for twenty-four years, as managing partner from 2000 until his retirement from the firm in 2006.

After retiring, he had a career as a mediator in commercial, real estate, and construction disputes and continued to serve Holland & Hart as of counsel and a member of its strategic planning committee. At the time of his death he was president of the Council of the Law Practice Management Section of the American Bar Association and a member of the editorial board of Law Practice magazine. He was an elected fellow, trustee, and president of the American College of Law Practice Management. A lifelong music lover, he particularly enjoyed jazz and in later years picked up the ukulele. He was a past president of the Colorado Opera Festival and a board member of the Palmer Land Trust, dedicated to preserving open space in southeastern Colorado. He was a golfer, biker, and marathoner and loved to travel in Italy. He was survived by his wife of forty-five years, Karen (Johnson); three daughters, Jennifer Adams, Rebecca Ciancanelli, and Elizabeth McClear; a sister, Frances Compton; and two grandchildren.

JEFFREY RAYMOND FORBES died on January 8, 1990, in Boston, Massachusetts. He was born November 29, 1941, in Greenfield, MA. He prepared at Beverly High School, Beverly, Massachuetts. He received an AB as of our Class in 1965 and attended Boston University Law School from 1968 to 1971. He served as an Army artillery officer during the Vietnam War and was the administrative assistant to the Republican leadership of the Massachusetts House of Representatives. He then served as the first full-time commissioner of the Massachusetts Community Antenna Television Commission from 1979 to 1981. As commissioner he oversaw the deregulation of the cable television industry and worked on establishing many of the guidelines for its development in the state. After leaving state government, Forbes became an executive with Lee Enterprises of Davenport, Iowa, until cancer forced him to retire. As an out-patient at Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, he counseled other patients and initiated a fund to provide a chapel for meditation there. Forbes was survived by his wife Maureen Grant, his father, Harold Forbes, and two sisters.

DAVID LEWIS FREEMAN died July 8, 2012, in Newton, Massachusetts. He was born November 15, 1942, in Worcester, Massachusetts, where he attended Classical High School. At Harvard he lived in Lowell House and was a member of Phillips Brooks House, the Harvard Outing Club, and Friends of Hillel, receiving his AB, magna cum laude in government, with the Class in 1964. He completed his MD at Harvard Medical School in 1969. He practiced rheumatology in Boston for four decades, most recently at the Lahey Clinic and the Carney Hospital. He was also active in the Arthritis Foundation. A student of Latin American government during his undergraduate years, he spent the summer of 1963 living in the city of Huaraz, in the Peruvian Andes, and developed an enduring love for its indigenous people and culture; later, as an officer in the US Public Health Service he worked with Central American governments to help control epidemic infectious disease, and he returned to the Andean region to volunteer medical assistance to survivors of the 1972 earthquake. He was a gifted pianist who played weekly at the Symphony Hall Café in Boston's Symphony Hall, as well as in nursing homes and hospitals, and served on the board of the Boston Piano Amateurs Association. He was a published expert on the twelfth-century Jewish physician-philosopher Moses Maimonides and the editor of 1999 anthology, Illness and Health in the Jewish Tradition. He was also a dedicated member of the social action committee at Temple Israel of Boston. He was survived by his wife, Amanda (Bautista); three sons, Joshua, Daniel '97, and Aaron; two sisters, Joanne Grossman and Judith Freedman; and two grandchildren.

THOMAS STANLEY FREEMAN, died of Parkinson's disease on July 21, 2013, in Pacific Palisades, California. Born in Chicago on April 22, 1942, he graduated from New Trier Township High School, in Winnetka, Illinois. At Harvard he lived in Lowell House and was a member of Phi Beta Kappa, the Glee Club, the Lampoon, the Bridge Club, and Friends of Hillel; he received his AB, magna cum laude highest honors in physics, with the Class in 1964. He went on to complete an MD at Harvard Medical School in 1969 and pursued residency in pediatrics at UCLA. He spent two years in the army as a staff pediatrician at Fort Sheridan, in Illinois. Later he practiced general pediatrics for twenty-eight years at Southern California Permanente Medical Group in Los Angeles. He and his wife, Joan (Latty) '66, JD '69, a former Radcliffe Choral Society member whom he met while singing in the Harvard Glee Club, continued to sing together throughout their forty-seven years of marriage, as longtime members of the adult and holiday choirs at the University Synagogue of Brentwood, California, and the Palisades-Brentwood Chorale. Besides his wife, he was survived by a daughter, Melanie, a son, Jonathan, and two grandchildren.

ERIC GALE FRIBERG died December 6, 2008, in Charleston, South Carolina. He was a retired director of McKinsey & Co. and remained on the firm's advisory council. He was a leader in southern philanthropic circles for many years, serving as board chairman of the High Museum in Atlanta, president of the Atlanta Opera, president and chairman of the Spoleto Festival USA, vice president of the Gibbes Museum of Art in Charleston, and board chairman of the Mason School of Business, College of William and Mary. He was a captain in the air force during the Vietnam War, earning the Air Force Commendation Medal. In 1992 he was made an officer of the Order of Leopold II by the government of Belgium. He leaves his wife, Susan (Taubert) '64, two daughters, Kristina Mangelsdorf '91 and Mary, a son, John '02, a sister, Paula, and brother, Karl, M.B.A. '73.

SAMUEL LIBERTY HARVEY FULLER died April 3, 2001, in Ocala, Florida. He was a research assistant in malacology at the Philadelphia Academy of Natural Sciences for seventeen years and also taught at Rutgers University. He was the author of dozens of papers on mollusks and the discoverer of several previously unknown species of freshwater mussels, including one named after him, Lampsilis Fullerkati. Most recently he worked as a research associate at the National Fisheries Research Center, US Fish and Wildlife Service, in Gainesville, Florida. He leaves a daughter, Rebecca, a sister, Tamsen, and two brothers, Henry and Woodbridge; a son, Samuel, died in 1983.

SONDRA "SUNNY" GAMOW GOLDENFARB died January 10, 2006, in Clearwater, Florida. She was born April 25, 1942, in Brooklyn, New York, and graduated from Teaneck (New Jersey) High School. While at Radcliffe she lived in Jordan Hall and worked on the Yearbook. A Phi Beta Kappa, she received her AB in government, magna cum laude, with the Class in 1964 and went on to obtain a JD, cum laude, at the Law School in 1967. Decades later she returned to Harvard to pursue a degree at the Kennedy School, completing an M.P.A. in 1997. She had a solo practice in family law in Clearwater for some years before joining the Florida Office of the Capital Collateral Representative as counsel to the state's death row population, assisting them in their eleventh-hour efforts to avoid execution. At her retirement in the late 1990s she was again in private practice, doing criminal defense work in the Clearwater firm of Tanney, Forde et al. She was former chairman of the Family Law Section of the Clearwater Bar Association, a board member of the Pinellas County Arts Council, and past president of the Harvard Club of the West Coast of Florida. She was survived by her husband of forty-one years, Paul '62; a daughter, Allyn Baylor '90; a son, Craig; her mother, Elaine Gamow; two brothers, David and Barry Gamow; and four grandchildren.

MOLLY THEODORA GERAGHTY died December 14, 1996, at Washington, Massachusetts. The daughter of Maurice Patrick and Helen (Tieken) Geraghty, she was born on August 27, 1942, in Dubuque, Iowa. She prepared at the Francis W. Parker School, Chicago, Illinois, and at the Pensionnat Le Manoir, Lausanne, Switzerland, before attending Radcliffe, where she received an AB, magna cum laude, in 1964. Following graduation, Ms. Geraghty enrolled at Harvard Law School, where she earned an LL.B. in 1967. She practiced law with the Boston firm of Goodwin, Proctor & Hoar for two years prior to becoming the producer of the WGBH television series, The Advocates, which won an Emmy in 1972. She remained with the show for five years before shifting her career focus to law school administration, working as assistant dean for Northeastern University's School of Law. In 1977, Ms. Geraghty returned to Harvard to become assistant dean and director of admissions for the law school. An avid cook and gardener, she moved to Washington, Massachusetts, in 1987 and concurrently took a position as associate dean of the law school at Western New England College, where she remained until 1994. Ms. Geraghty was a former president of the Berkshire County Historical Society and a trustee of the Becket Arts Center. Her memberships included the Selden Society, the Medieval Academy of America, the Flat Earth Society, and the Washington Conservation Commission. Survivors include her former husband, Eric Teicholz, and her sisters, Helen Geraghty-Weissman (Radcliffe '60) and Betsy Fryberger.

DOROTHY GILES SOUVAINE AM '66, died February 19 in Rockport, Massachusetts. She taught classics at the Winsor School in Boston for 27 years before retiring in 2002. Earlier she was an editor of classical monographs for Harvard University Press and taught classics and mythology for a year at Boston University. A deacon and chairman of the board of deacons at First Congregational Church of Reading, she was a founding member of the advisory committee for the Theological Opportunities Program at Harvard Divinity School. She was a certified bridge instructor. She leaves three daughters, Christine Soutter '72, PhD '08, Diane '75, and Emily Meehan '79, EdD '99, four sons, Roy, Clifford, Clayton, and Gary Heaton '84, and a brother, Allen Giles; two husbands, Henry Souvaine '47 and R. Gordon Heaton, SM '47, predeceased her.

DAVID BARRY POLIAKOFF GOODMAN died February 17, 2003, in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. He was a professor of pathology and laboratory medicine at the University of Pennsylvania and director of the its hospital's endocrinology laboratory. His principal research interests were the workings of hormones and critical vitamins in the body and the role of the kidneys in maintaining electrolyte balance. Before joining the Penn faculty in 1980, he taught at Yale. He was a past president of the Harvard Club of Philadelphia. He leaves his wife, J. Kathleen (Fisher Greenacre) '64, MD '68, two sons, Derek and Alex, and a sister, Beverly Wesman.

LEWIS SETH GOODMAN died of cancer on September 4, 2013, in New York, New York. A native New Yorker, he was born May 30, 1942, and prepared at Belmont Hill School, in Belmont, Massachusetts. He lived in Leverett House and concentrated in economics at Harvard, where he was a member of Phillips Brooks House and Friends of Hillel, and received his AB, cum laude, with the Class in 1964. A member of the New York Stock Exchange, he worked for forty-five years as a private investment broker in New York. He had a passion for mineralogy and, together with his wife, was a leading collector of petrified wood and agates. He was survived by his wife of forty-eight years, Peggy (Rains); a daughter, Margaret Ford; a son, Adam; his mother, Elaine Correa; and four grandchildren.

JOEL HARVEY GORDON died of cancer on May 22, 2013, in Pittsfield, Massachusetts. The son of Arthur and Pearl Gordon, he was born in the Bronx on March 3, 1943, and prepared at Boston Latin School. A member of Dudley House and Phi Beta Kappa while at Harvard, he received his AB, magna cum laude in chemistry and physics, in 1964. He earned an MS in chemistry at the University of California, Berkeley, in 1967. An expert on water pollution, he worked for more than thirty years as a chemist and lab director at the Pittsfield Wastewater Treatment Plant. He created and maintained a website about water pollution and treatment, flushgordon.info, that has helped to educate students and professionals around the world. He was recognized for his contributions by the New England Water Environment Association. Early in his career he worked in a lab doing pollutant analysis, focusing particularly on pesticides and PCBs, and taught chemistry at a high school and a junior college. An early computing enthusiast, he was a member of the local Commodore Computer Club. In addition to science, he loved photography, music, biking, cross-country skiing, Scrabble and crosswords, and the natural beauty of the Berkshire Hills. He spoke fluent German. He was survived by his wife, of forty-five years, Kathleen (Cullinane); a daughter, Kathleen; two sons, Peter and Jeffrey; and a sister, Ruth.

QUENTIN ANTHONY GORDON died July 13, 1966, at New York City. The son of John Wyatt and Ruth (Monsch) Gordon, he was born September 17, 1942, in St. Louis, Missouri. He prepared at Kent School, Kent, Connecticut, before coming to Harvard where he received an AB in 1964. Tony was a resident of Kirkland House, and was a member of the freshman soccer team. During 1965-66 he attended Harvard Business School. He was survived by his mother.

WILLIAM ANTHONY GRANA died of cancer on February 1, 2013, in Tucson, Arizona. He was born October 21, 1942, in St. Louis, Missouri, where he attended Southwest High School. A three-time All-Ivy running back while at Harvard, he lived in Winthrop House and was a member of the Varsity Club and Hasty Pudding, receiving his AB with the Class in 1964. He completed his MD at Harvard Medical School in 1968 and returned to St. Louis for residency at Washington University. He spent two years in the air force, including one in South Vietnam as an adviser to the State Department in a program to help the Vietnamese manage their provincial hospital system. After finishing residency in orthopedic surgery at Washington University, he went to the University of Oklahoma Medical Center for a fellowship in sports medicine. From 1975 to 2000 he served on the faculty of the University of Oklahoma College of Medicine, where he was a clinical professor of orthopedics and director of sports medicine. In 1983 he founded the state's first multidisciplinary sports medicine clinic, the Oklahoma Center for Athletes. He was also the president of Oklahoma City's largest orthopedic practice, Oklahoma Orthopaedics, Inc., and went back to school in his fifties to obtain an MPH at the University of Oklahoma in 1995. He moved to Tucson in 2000 to accept a position as the first head of the Department of Orthopedic Surgery at the University of Arizona College of Medicine; he became professor emeritus in 2011. For more than thirty years, first in Oklahoma and later in Tucson, he directed a fellowship in orthopedic sports medicine. He was active for many years as a team physician at the national and local levels. He was team physician to the US Olympic Festival in Houston in 1986, the US team at the Winter World University Games in Cortina, Italy, in 1985, the US team at the 1987 Pan American Games in Indianapolis, and the US team at the 1988 Summer Olympics in Seoul; he also served as team physician to many high school and university athletic programs and as a consultant to several professional sports organizations, including the Chicago White Sox. He was a past president of the American Orthopaedic Society for Sports Medicine and a member of the Thomas B. Quigley Sports Medicine Society. He was also active in the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons, serving as founding editor-in-chief of its educational website, Orthopaedic Knowledge Online. He was survived by his wife of forty-eight years, Susan (Eschrich); a daughter, Beth Wing; a son, William; and three grandchildren.

WILLIAM BARTON GRAY died on March 22, 1994, in Boston, Massachusetts. He was born on February 14, 1942, in Brattleboro, Vermont. He prepared at the Putney School in Vermont. He received an AB with our Class and an LL.B. from the University of Pennsylvania in 1967. In 1968 Bill served as law clerk to the Honorable Sterry R. Waterman, United States Circuit Judge for the Second Circuit. From 1968 to 1972 Bill was an Assistant United States Attorney for the Southern District of New York. In 1972 he returned to Vermont as an Assistant US Attorney. He was Associate Deputy Attorney General for the Department of Justice from 1975 to 1977 and then US Attorney in Vermont. In 1986, he served as chairman of US Senator Patrick Leahy's successful re-election campaign. In 1988, Gray ran unsuccessfully for the US Senate against Senator James Jeffords. At the time of his death, Gray was an attorney with Sheehey, Brue, Gray, and Furlong in Burlington, Vermont. He had just been nominated to the Second US Circuit Court of Appeals, but confirmation hearings were delayed because of his health. Gray was survived by his wife, Sarah Kerlin, and his children Joshua Barton '90, and Sarah Hawkes.

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DIANE GREENE died November 20, 2001. She was born in Houston, Texas, on November 15, 1942, and prepared at Saint Mary's Hall, in San Antonio. She lived in North House (Comstock) and was a member of Phillips Brooks House while at Radcliffe. She completed a master's degree at the University of Texas, Austin in 1970. For several years she operated the family pecan orchard in LaCoste, Texas, and later taught English at the University of Texas and Palo Alto College, both in San Antonio. No information about surviving family was available.

RONALD JAMES GREENE, LL.B. '68scl, died October 31, 2002, in Fairfax, Virginia. A Washington lawyer, he was an army captain from 1969 to 1972, serving as assistant to the general counsel of the army. Later he became a partner in the law firm of Wilmer, Cutler & Pickering, where he specialized in eases involving antitrust and trade regulation, banking, and consumer credit. He was an active member of the Harvard Club of Washington for many years. He leaves his wife, Sonia (Sternberg), a daughter Nancy Trainer '95, JD '01, a son, David '91, M.B.A. '96, and a brother, Martin '61, MD '65.

NANCY GRIFFIN JACKSON died in Cambridge, MA, on October 2, 1992. She was born in Cambridge on May 2, 1943, and prepared at Buckingham School in Cambridge. She received an AB, magna cum laude, as of our Class in 1965, and an MA and MPhil from Rutgers University in 1971. Nancy Jackson worked as a free-lance editor and writer whose clients included Harvard Magazine, the Business School Bulletin, and various specialized business publications. For Harvard Magazine, she wrote the notes section from 1977 to 1990 and some features, short profiles, and interviews. She was survived by her son Eric '88.

CHARLES EDWARD GUNNOE, Ed.D. '76, died October 1, 2004, in Wayland, Massachusetts. He was a Boston neuropsychologist affiliated with the child psychiatry unit at Massachusetts General Hospital and with Franciscan Children's Hospital in Brighton. Earlier he was chief psychologist of children's services at New England Memorial Hospital (later Boston Regional Medical Center) in Stoneham. In the late 1970s he worked as a clinical psychologist at Children's Hospital in Boston, where he played a key role in a landmark clinical study on the neuropsychological effects of low levels of lead exposure in children. A midfielder on Harvard's 1964 Ivy League Championship lacrosse team, he was a second-team All-American. He was active in community affairs in Newton, coaching girls' soccer and serving as copresident of the Hyde School PTO. He leaves two daughters, Eliza and Katherine, and his mother, Margaret Rose.

FELICIA HANCE STEWART died April 13, 2006, in San Carlos, California. She was born in Washington, DC, on March 14, 1943, the daughter of Harold and Lena Hance. She left Radcliffe after freshman year and finished her BA at the University of California, Berkeley, but returned to Harvard for her MD, which she completed in 1969. She was an obstetrician-gynecologist and a leading expert in the field of women's reproductive health. She had a private practice in Sacramento for twenty years while also working part-time as a staff doctor for Planned Parenthood. In 1993 she became director of medical research at the Sutter Medical Foundation, in Sacramento, and the following year joined the Clinton administration as deputy assistant secretary for population affairs at the Department of Health and Human Services. There, as the senior national official responsible for family planning and population issues, she brought emergency contraception—also called Plan B, or the "morning-after pill"—to the attention of physicians and medical officials before the pills were widely available. She also worked to improve communication between doctors and patients in matters relating to women's health. In 1996 she went to work for the Henry J. Kaiser Family Foundation, in Menlo Park, California, as director of reproductive health, and at her retirement in 2005 she was codirecting the Center for Reproductive Health Research and Policy at the University of California, San Francisco. She was the author of Understanding Your Body: Everywoman's Guide to a Lifetime of Health and My Body, My Health: The Concerned Woman's Guide to Gynecology and Health, and was the coauthor of Contraceptive Technology, a professional reference book that has gone to eighteen editions. She was past chairwoman of the Association of Reproductive Health Professionals. She was survived by a daughter, Kathryn; a son, Matthew '98; three stepchildren, Tammy Barlow, Wayne Stewart, and Michael Stewart; her parents; and a brother, Allan Hance.

KENNETH GEORGE HANCOCK died on October 10, 1993 in Budapest, Hungary. He was born on March 11, 1942, in St. Louis, Missouri. He prepared at St. Louis Country Day School. He received an AB, cum laude, in 1963 as of our Class, and a PhD from the University of Wisconsin in 1968. He was an assistant and associate professor of chemistry at the University of California at Davis until 1977 when he joined the National Science Foundation as a program director. At the time of his death he was director of the chemistry division. Hancock died suddenly while on business in Budapest, Hungary. An obituary in the Chemical and Engineering News stated, "At the time of his death, he was attending a workshop that combined two areas of his interest, and that he had worked hard to promote environmental chemistry and international collaboration among scientists." NSF acting director said, "We feel Ken's loss acutely in the professional sense, not only in the sphere of chemistry where he was a strong, innovative activist, but throughout the foundation, because Ken's vision spanned the boundaries of disciplines." He was survived by his wife Diane Kerr '63, and his three children, Kenneth Scott, John Arthur '93, and Catherine Yvonne '96.

RALPH WARNER HARBISON II died of a heart attack on February 16, 2002, while skiing in North Elba, New York. He had been dean of the School of Education at the State University of New York at Albany since 2000. Previously he had a 20-year career as an economist with the World Bank, where he was education sector manager for the Sooth Asia region, overseeing the hank's largest education lending program worldwide. He also co-wrote two hooks, Labor Markets and Social Policy in Central and Eastern Europe and Educational Performance of the Poor. He served in the Peace Corps in Costa Rica during the 1960's and worked for 11 years as an adviser to the Ford Foundation in West Africa. He was an ardent conservationist, hiker, sailor, opera buff, and world traveler. He leaves his wife, M. Irene (Moss), a daughter, Jennifer, a son, Frederick, his mother, Josephine, and a brother, William.

WALTER WARREN HARP died November 8, 2005, in Cambridge, Massachusetts. He was born November 6, 1942, in New Rochelle, New York, and attended Linton High School, in Schenectady. He lived in Lowell House and volunteered with Phillips Brooks House while at Harvard, receiving his AB in English, cum laude, with the Class in 1964. After graduation he spent a year teaching in Africa with Project Tanganyika. He was a professor of humanities for twenty-nine years at Berklee College of Music, in Boston, where he taught Western civilization, sociology, American history, and English composition. He had a passion for fine literature and classical music. He was survived by his wife of twenty-four years, Ilse Peter; a daughter, Erika; two sons, Samuel and Gabriel; his father, Elting; a sister, Virginia; a brother, Ned; and a granddaughter.

DAVID HARRIS died on July 14, 1989. He was born on February 7, 1944, in Brooklyn, New York. He prepared at Midwood High School in Brooklyn. He received an AB, magna cum laude, with our Class in 1964 and a PhD from Harvard in 1972. In the 25th Report, Harris wrote that he was a technical manager in the US Defense Department and a mathematician. He was a member of the American Mathematical Society, the Mathematics Association of America, the American Statistical Association, the Institute of Mathematical Statistics, and the American Civil Liverties Union. He was survived by his wife, Joanne Meryl Ratner, and his three step-children, Lisa, Matthew, and Daniel.

EDMUND ARTHUR HENNESSY, JR. of Carpinteria, California, died April 23, 2007. He was born June 8, 1942, and prepared at Middlesex School, in Concord, Massachusetts. A Kirkland House resident and member of the Signet Society while at Harvard, he received his AB with the Class in 1964. He was a rare book dealer specializing in first editions and Oriental antiques, first in New York City and later in California. His survivors included his mother, Pat Griffith.

RICHARD ALLAN HIRSCH of Larkspur, California, died June 6, 2003. A Marin County attorney and social activist for many years, he was former head legal counsel for the United Farm Workers, in Marysville, and former head of the Marin Legal Aid Society. He was also past president of United Cerebral Palsy for the State of California. He was a lover of the outdoors who enjoyed biking and river rafting with his family and championed conservation causes. He leaves two sons,Jon and Adam.

DANIEL BINGHAM HOBBING died in January of 1991. He was born on October 13, 1942, in Boston, Massachusetts. He prepared at Governor Dummer Academy. He received an AB in 1977 as of our Class and an M.Ed. from Harvard in 1979. At the time of his death he was living in Cambridge, working as a writer. The Class Secretary has received no other information regarding his activities since graduation.

JAMES FREDERIC HOLT died October 10, 2011, in Janesville, Wisconsin, of cardiac arrest. Born September 25, 1942, in Richland Center, Wisconsin, he graduated from Janesville High School. He was a member of Dudley House and Phillips Brooks House while at Harvard, receiving his AB, cum laude in general studies, in 1964. The following year he completed an MA in political science at the University of Wisconsin, Madison. He enjoyed a twenty-seven-year career as a secondary-school teacher and coach, teaching social studies and humanities at high schools in Neenah, Watertown, Platteville, and Janesville, Wisconsin, and at Lake Forest Academy in Illinois and coaching teams in cross-country, track, debating, and Model UN. A highlight of his fourteen years at Craig High School in Janesville was coaching the 1991 girls' cross-country team, winner of that year's WIAA (Wisconsin Interscholastic Athletic Association) Division 1 championship. He quit teaching in 1993 to embark on a second career in human resources, from which he retired in 2007. He was a passionate advocate of social justice and a stalwart fan of the Chicago Cubs. He was survived by his wife of forty-four years, Judy (Meike); a daughter, Wendy '90; a son, Peter; a sister, Mary; a brother, Robert; and three grandchildren.

DONALD COWGER HOOPER died on May 16, 1993. He was born in Westboro, Massachusetts, on June 6, 1940. He prepared at Needham High School and attended Harvard for two years with our Class. The Class Secretary has received no further information regarding Hooper's activities since he left the College.

ROGER BROOKE HOPKINS III died July 31, 2013, in Salt Lake City, Utah. He was born in Baltimore on March 25, 1942, and prepared at Hotchkiss School, in Lakeville, Connecticut. An Eliot House resident at Harvard and a member of the varsity heavyweight crew, he also belonged to the Fly Club, Signet Society, Hasty Pudding, and St. Paul Church. He received his AB, magna cum laude in English, in 1964 and remained at Harvard—except for a year at St. John's College, Oxford, on a Knox Fellowship—to get his PhD, also in English, completed in 1970. He was an assistant professor of English at Harvard until 1975, when he joined the faculty of the University of Utah, and there spent the rest of his career. A specialist in British Romantic poetry, he won many awards for his teaching, including the University of Utah Distinguished Teaching Award, and was named a University Professor. He chaired the English department and helped found the university's writing program. He was an adventurous world traveler, an outdoors enthusiast, a blues and jazz lover, and a gregarious and gifted cook. Shortly after retiring in 2008, he suffered catastrophic injuries in a biking accident, resulting in quadriplegia. He continued to teach continuing-education courses from his wheelchair in his living room, mostly for retired educators, over the next few years. He and his wife, Peggy Battin, were the subjects of a New York Times Magazine cover story, "A Life-or-Death Situation," about end-of-life decision making, on July 17. A first marriage to Nancy Doe '64, PhD '71, ended in divorce in 1974. In addition to his wife of twenty-seven years, Margaret (Pabst) Battin, he was survived by two stepchildren, Sara Pearson and Michael Battin; a sister, Lisa Wheeler; and four step-grandchildren.

CHARLES EDMUND HORMAN died September 18, 1973, at Santiago, Chile. He was one of the victims of the Chilean coup of 1973 led by General Augusto Pinochet, which deposed the socialist president, Salvador Allende. Horman's case was made famous by Costa-Gavras' 1982 film Missing.The son of Edmund C. Horman, he was born May 14, 1942, in New York City. He prepared at Phillips Exeter Academy and at Harvard received an AB, magna cum laude, in 1964. While at Harvard he was a resident of Leverett House and received the first Leverett House Prize for Creative Writing. After six months of active duty with the Air National Guard, he began making documentary films for television, one of which won first prize at the Cracow and Mannheim festivals. This film, about the reaction to a napalm plant in a small California town, was also shown at the New York Film Festival. In addition to film-making, he was a free-lance writer and later worked in radio and television. Horman was active in electoral and community organizing politics. His wife, the former Joyce Hamren, whom he married in 1968, survived him.

CHARLES THOMAS HUGGINS died July 27, 2012, in Augusta, Georgia. The son of Charles Willard and Sarah Fleming Huggins, he was born in Martin, Tennessee, on October 19, 1942, and was the valedictorian of his graduating class at Madeira High School in Cincinnati. At Harvard he lived in Winthrop House and was a member of the football team and the Sigma Alpha Epsilon fraternity, receiving his AB with the Class in 1964. He then entered law school at the University of Georgia, where he was a founding member of the Georgia Law Review and completed his LLB in 1967. He began his legal career as an associate in the Augusta firm of Cumming, Nixon, Eve, Waller & Capers. In 1981 he cofounded the firm of Huggins & Allen, specializing in real estate law. Active for many years as a community leader in Augusta, he was chairman of the board of trustees of Episcopal Day School, president of the Augusta Assembly, president of the Clinton-Anderson Hospital Foundation, and senior warden of the Church of the Good Shepherd, and a trustee of the Augusta YMCA and Historic Augusta. He was survived by his wife of fortyseven years, Sada (Mason); a daughter, Elizabeth Elliott; two sons, Charles and Wilson; a sister, Mary McLane; a brother, John; and eight grandchildren.

FORNEY HUTCHINSON III died of cancer on January 20, 2013, in Charlotte, North Carolina. He was born August 25, 1942, in Tulsa, Oklahoma, the son of Forney Hutchinson, Jr., and Dorothy Thompson Hutchinson, and graduated from Thomas Edison High School in Tulsa. A Quincy House resident while at Harvard, he lettered in varsity lightweight crew, was a member of Phillips Brooks House and the Hasty Pudding, and received his AB with the Class in 1964. He completed his MD at the Duke University School of Medicine in 1968. He was commissioned into the US Army as an orthopedic surgeon and was assigned from 1970 to 1972 to the army hospital at Fort Campbell, Kentucky, a designated Vietnam Casualty and Evacuation Center, attaining the rank of major. After finishing his formal orthopedic training at Duke, in 1976 he joined the Miller Orthopaedic Clinic (later OrthoCarolina) in Charlotte, where he was a specialist in hand and elbow surgery until his retirement in 2008. He especially loved teaching young doctors in the local residency program and won numerous teaching awards. He served as chief of orthopedics at Carolinas HealthCare System for fifteen years and was an on-call orthopedic trauma surgeon for thirty years. He was also an oral examiner for the American Board of Orthopaedic Surgery, a contributing editor of the Journal of Orthopaedic Trauma and the Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery, and a consulting surgeon to the Carolina Panthers football team. He traveled to Africa and Central America several times to volunteer his medical services and devoted much time to treating indigent patients at Carolinas HealthCare System. In his off hours he enjoyed skiing, scuba diving, and fly fishing. A first marriage ended in divorce. He was survived by his wife, Valeria; two daughters, Karen Ridout and Ellen Johnson; and a sister, Nancy Gasen.

ROBERT DAVID JOFFE died of cancer on January 28, 2010, in New York, New York. He was born in Manhattan on May 26, 1943, and attended Columbia High School in Maplewood, New Jersey. A Leverett House resident at Harvard, he received his AB, cum laude in general studies, in 1964 and then went on to the Law School, where he was a member of Lincoln's Inn and an editor of the Harvard Civil Rights-Civil Liberties Law Review; he completed his JD, cum laude, in 1967. Upon graduation he joined the New York firm of Cravath, Swaine & Moore, but after just a couple of months as an associate there he left for Africa on an Africa-Asia Public Service Fellowship funded by the Ford Foundation; he spent two years, 1967 to 1969, in the Ministry of Justice of Malawi, assisting the commissioner for law revision in rewriting the country's laws and establishing a framework for supervision of the local courts. He was named a partner at Cravath in 1975 and was presiding partner of the firm from 1999 until 2006. Known nationally and internationally for his skills as a litigator on behalf of senior executives, boards of directors, and corporations, he served for many years as the primary outside lawyer for Time Warner; as such he handled the merger of Time, Inc., with Warner Communications and was the principal litigator for Time, Inc., in repelling Paramount's attempted takeover bid in 1989, considered a landmark case in the field of M&A litigation. He was a longtime adviser to the nonmanagement directors of Fannie Mae and counsel to the independent directors of Merrill Lynch, Citigroup, General Electric, General Motors, and many other companies. A lifelong champion of civil rights and a strong believer in the importance of pro bono legal work, in 1989 he argued Martin v. Wilks pro bono before the US Supreme Court, representing African American and women employees in Birmingham, Alabama, in their fight to obtain equal employment opportunity. (Although he lost the argument 5-4, Congress effectively reversed the court's decision two years later with the Civil Rights Act of 1991.) He was an active member and former vice chairman of Human Rights First. A first marriage to Selby (Hickey) ended in divorce in 1978. He was survived by his wife of twenty-nine years, Virginia "Dinny" (Ryan); a daughter, Katherine; a son, David '00; two stepchildren, Ryan and Elizabeth DeHaas; his mother, Bertha; two brothers, Paul '69 and Richard, PhD '84; and two grandchildren.

CHASE WILLIAM JOHNSON died June 4, 1996. The son of Charles William and Jeanne (Gephart) Johnson, he was born May 30, 1942, in Newton, MA. He prepared at St. Mark's School, Southborough, MA, before coming to Harvard, where he received an AB, cum laude, as of our Class. While at Harvard, Dr. Johnson was a resident of Quincy House and a member of the Hasty Pudding, Phillips Brooks House, and the Crimson Key Society. Following graduation, Dr. Johnson attended Stanford Medical School, earning his M.D. in 1969. He performed his residency at Good Samaritan Hospital in Portland, OR, and, in 1974, went on to establish his own surgical practice. His survivors include his wife, Jacalyn, whom he married in 1983; his sister, Candace Kosel; his stepdaughter, Robyn Wells; and one grandchild.

LORELLA MARGARET JONES died on February 9, 1995, at Champaign, Illinois. The daughter of Donald Cecil and Florence S. (Patterson) Jones, she was born February 22, 1943, in Toronto, Ontario, Canada. A resident of East House, Dr. Jones concentrated in mathematics and graduated, magna cum laude, in 1964. She then moved to California to attend the California Institute of Technology, where she subsequently received her M.Sc. in 1966 and her PhD in 1968. By 1974, she was an associate professor of physics at the University of Illinois, Urbana, Illinois. At the time of our Fifteenth Anniversary, she had been promoted to full professor. The focus of her research was high energy physics, more specifically, the force binding nuclear particles to quarks. A sabbatical during the 1981-82 academic year allowed Dr.Jones to devote her time to working with both DESY and CERN accelerators and, in 1982, she was chosen as a fellow of the American Physical Society in the division of particles and fields. Beginning in 1992, Dr. Jones served as the director of the university's Education Research Laboratory, a position she retained until 1994. Dr. Jones remained at the University of Illinois for her entire career, publishing sixty-four papers based upon her research. She was survived by her parents and her sister, Irene.

RICHARD PRESTON JONES of Lakewood, Washington, died September 28, 2010. Born in New York City on July 25, 1942, he prepared at St. Paul's School, in Concord, New Hampshire. He lived in Kirkland House while at Harvard, was a member of the varsity track team and A. D. Club, and received his AB with the Class in 1964. He spent the following year in graduate study at the University of Massachusetts, Amherst, earning both an MA in English and an MFA in poetry in 1969. In the late 1970s he moved to Washington State, where he continued to write poetry and taught English for many years at Pacific Lutheran University, in Tacoma. A 1964 first marriage to Mary (Chandler) ended in divorce in 1977; his second wife of twenty years, Julia (Bramlett), died in 2005. The Class has no current information about his surviving family; in the Fifteenth Anniversary Report he listed three children, Amanda, Alexandra, and Ian.

DANIEL NORMAN KALIKOW died February 26, 2009, in Westford, Massachusetts. He was born in Lynn on March 2, 1943, the son of Irving and Rose Cohen Kalikow, and attended Swampscott (Massachusetts) High School. He was a resident of Quincy House while at Harvard and received his AB in psychology, cum laude, with the Class in 1964. He went to Brown University for his graduate work in experimental psychology, earning his MA in 1966 and his PhD in 1969. He was an assistant professor of psychology at the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, for a couple of years before returning to Cambridge to join the Bolt Beranek and Newman, the consulting firm and Internet pioneer. There he spent eleven years working on applied engineering projects in a wide range of areas, from psychoacoustics to the design of personal computer interfaces; in 1973 he coordinated BBN's lab analysis of the infamous "eighteen-and-a-half-minute gap" in the White House audiotape that played a pivotal role in the Watergate hearings, culminating in President Nixon's resignation. In 1980 he moved to Prime Computer, in Framingham, and after Prime's demise in 1992 he became a computer scientist at Digital Equipment Corporation, in Maynard. In 1998 he went over to Reed Elsevier Technology Group, in Cambridge, as R&D senior technology consultant on the company's diverse publishing ventures. He was survived by his wife of forty-five years, Deborah (Weiss); two daughters, Joanna Holway '90 and Amanda Byrd '93; a sister, Theodora; and a grandson.

CYRUS ANTHONY KAMUNDIA died March 2, 1972, in Tanzania. The son of Wilson Mwangi Kamundia, he was born September 28, 1939, in Nyeri, Kenya. He prepared at the Royal College, Nairobi, Kenya, received an AB, cum laude, at Harvard in 1964 and received a doctorate at a French University. While at Harvard he was a resident of Quincy House and was a member of Experimenters in International Living. He was a lecturer in political science and international relations at the University of Nairobi and was a prominent commentator on national and international affairs. A member of the Kenya Rally Drivers' Club, he was killed when his rally practice car crashed in Tanzania's Usambra Mountains. He was survived by his wife.

JOSEPH RONALD KENDLER died December 6, 1974, at New York City. The son of Irving N. Kendler, he was born January 17, 1943, in New York City, prepared at the Midwood High School and received two degrees from Harvard: an AB in 1964, and an LL.B. in 1967. A resident of Eliot House, he served as editor of the Harvard Classical Journal and was a member of the Classics Club and Hasty Pudding. At the time of the Tenth Anniversary Report, Kendler was employed as senior institutional securities analyst at Hayden Stone, Inc., New York City. In 1974 he joined the New York brokerage firm of Tucker, Anthony & R.L. Day. Kendler was survived by his wife, the former Hope Adler, whom he married in 1974.

THOMAS FREDERICK KENNY II died February 5, 1988, at Princeton, New Jersey. He was born May 25, 1942, in Buckingham, PQ, Canada, and attended Phillips Academy, Andover, MA. A resident of Adams House, he received his AB cum laude. As an undergraduate at Harvard, Kenny's field of concentration was government. He played football and was a member of the crew. Kenny received an LL.B. from Columbia University in 1967. At the time of his death, he worked as counsel to the Agricultural Group at American Cyanamid Company in Wayne, New Jersey. Kenny was survived by his wife, Tracy Bean, whom he married on July 29, 1967, by his children Elizabeth '70 and Erin '74, by his parents, Thomas Ramsey Kenny and Elizabeth Gracy Kenny, and by a sister, Lynne Kenny Scott.

EUGENE KINASEWICH, CAS '72, Ed.D. '81, died February 23, 2005, in Newton, Massachusetts. One of fourteen children of Ukrainian immigrants in Alberta, Canada, he was orphaned at 10 and in his teens played with his brothers on an Edmonton hockey team sponsored by the Detroit Red Wings. When he came to Harvard, the Ivy League and the ECAC barred him from the rink because of the small stipend he had received on that team; he was cleared to play after his testimony in a highly publicized hearing. He became a Crimson athletic legend when, in 1963, he scored three goals against Boston College in the ECAC championship game, including one in overtime, to win the trophy for Harvard. Later he taught American history at Buckingham, Browne & Nichols School and was an administrator at Harvard before returning to Edmonton to help run his family's business, K-Bro Linen Systems, a hospital laundry service. After retiring in 1997, he returned to the Boston area. He continued to play with the Bombers Hockey Club, in Gloucester, and in recent years sponsored a hockey exchange program for Ukrainian, American, and Canadian youth. He leaves a daughter, Tanya, two sons, Robert and Gregory, two sisters, Anne and Stephanie, six brothers, William, Nicholas, Michael, Raymond, Orest, and Robert, and his former wife, Janet (Mittell) '74, Ed.M. '78. Click here to read the obituary that appeared in the Boston Globe.

JONATHAN DONALD KRAMER died June 3 in Manhattan. A musicologist and composer, he was a professor of composition and theory at Columbia University. Before joining the Columbia faculty in 1988, he taught at the Oberlin Conservatory, Yale, and the University of Cincinnati, where he was director of electronic music. His compositions were recorded on the Leonarda, Advance, Orion, Opus One, and Grenadilla labels and published by Schirmer and MMB. He was a longtime program annotator for the Cincinnati Symphony, where he was composer-in-residence and new-music adviser from 1984 to 1992. He was a board member of the American Music Center, an editor of the Contemporary Music Review, and vice president of the International Society for the Study of Time. His books include The Time of Music and Time in Contemporary Musical Thought. He leaves his wife, Deborah Bradley, a daughter, Stephanie, a son, Zachary, his father, Maxwell, and his former wife, Norma (Berson).

ALLEN LLOYD KYLE died November 5, 2009, in Seattle, Washington. He was born in Auburn, Washington, on January 25, 1943, the son of Henry and Virginia Kyle; his parents both died while he was still a child, and from the age of thirteen he was raised by an older brother, Stan, and his wife, Donna. He graduated from Lakeside School in Seattle and was a member of Dudley House while at Harvard. He received his AB in mathematics in 1968, having left after freshman year to serve for three years in the air force. He worked as an actuary at Safeco Insurance Company, in Seattle, before becoming a certified public accountant. His interests included opera, natural history, and history, and he was an avid follower of local sports teams, notably the University of Washington Huskies and the Seattle Mariners. The Class has no current information about his surviving family.

JEFFREY LOUIS LAMBERT died November 13, 2000, in Providence, Rhode Island. He practiced dentistry for more than twenty ;years in South Attleboro, Massachusetts and was one of the first dentists in the area to place and restore dental implants. A talented high-school athlete and avid sports fan, he was a member of the Attlehoro Area Football Hall of Fame; he also played football at Harvard and was a permanent member of his class's reunion committee. He was a creative and skilled cabinetmaker and gardener. He leaves his second wife, Karen (Storm), three daughters, Paula Anderson, Patricia Fitzpatrick, and Emilie, and two sons, Peter and Stephen.

ANTHONY WALKER LECOMPTE died November 14, 1967, at Honolulu, Hawaii. The son of Philip Medford and Jean (Sykes) LeCompte, he was born August 19, 1942, in New Haven, Connecticut. He prepared at Roxbury Latin School, Roxbury, Massachusetts, and at Harvard was a member of Eliot House and received an AB in 1966, as of our Class. He was survived by his parents.

FREDERICK KEITH LENHERR died October 16, 2000, in New Salem, Massachusetts. He was a computer engineer and the founder of New Salem Research, specializing in computer design, research, and websites. He was also affiliated with the University of Massachusetts at Amherst for many years as a senior research scientist in the Center for Intelligent Information Retrieval and Applied Computing and, most recently, a senior research fellow in the department of computer science. In the early 1980s he worked as a senior engineer at Visual Intelligence Corp. in Amherst. He was a lover of nature and country living. He leaves no immediate survivors.

LESLIE LESSINGER died March 13, 2009, in Brooklyn, New York. He was a professor emeritus of chemistry at Barnard College, where he taught from 1977 to 2008. A specialist in x-ray crystallography, he chaired Barnard's chemistry department several times and from 1986 to 2004 codirected the college's Centennial Scholars program. After graduation from Harvard he spent eighteen months studying at the Centre for Advanced Study of Physics at the University of Madras, India, which instilled in him an abiding love for that country. He had a lifelong passion for social justice and a love of classical music. He leaves his wife, Johanna Mayhew '65, his mother, Minnie, and a brother, Eric '68.

ALEXANDER ARTHUR LEVIN died February 21, 2003, in Lebanon, New Hampshire. A gifted linguist who spent half his childhood in Mazatlan, Mexico, he taught Mandarin Chinese and Chinese poetry at Dartmouth before becoming a senior lecturer in Spanish. He led more study-abroad trips than any other member of the Dartmouth faculty, accompanying his students to Spain or Mexico for three months a year during the past twenty-two years. He was an avid birder and a licensed pilot. He leaves his wife, Susan Vogt, a son, Owen, a sister, Suzanne, and a brother, Ernest. Another son, John, died in 1982.

PAUL ARNOLD LEVIN died July 17, 1983, at Chicago, Illinois. The son of Carl Louis and Mildred (Wolper) Levin, he was born April 3, 1943, in Chicago, Illinois. Levin prepared at the South Shore High School in Chicago, Illinois, before coming to Harvard and earning his AB with our Class. He entered the metals reclamation industry working in Montreal and Indiana. Levin then switched to the stockbrokerage profession, joining the Chicago firm of Mesirow & Company as a limited partner, and later associating himself with PAL Securities Ltd. Memberships with the Midwest Stock Exchange and the Chicago Board of Trade were among his professional affiliations. Levin's survivors included his wife, the former Margot Brady, whom he married in 1964, and their three children, Caron, David, and Emily.

ROGER BERT LEVIN of Sherman, Connecticut, died January 3, 2014. He was born in Manhattan on May 14, 1942, and prepared at Phillips Academy in Andover. A member of Dudley House while at Harvard, he received his AB, cum laude in general studies, in 1965. Later he completed an MA in psychology at The New School for Social Research in New York City and a PhD in clinical psychology at the Saybrook Institute in San Francisco. He practiced psychotherapy in New Milford, Connecticut, for more than three decades. He was survived by his wife, MaryAnn Walker; four stepchildren, Alicia, Anthony, Nicholas, and Andrew Messina; and a brother, David Kleinberg-Levin '61.

THOMAS EDWARD PHILLIPS LEVIN died May 9,1983, at Los Angeles, California. The son of Jack I. Levin '40, and Helen Phillips Levin, he was born October 4, 1942, in Minneapolis, Minnesota. Levin prepared at the University High School in Los Angeles, California, before coming to Harvard and earning his AB with our Class. Upon graduation, he joined IBM's computer software department in Poughkeepsie, New York. Levin later moved to Los Angeles, where he established himself in the securities profession. He married Susan Recht and had two children: Jason and Shana. His survivors included his parents and his uncle Harry Levin, the Irving Babbitt Professor of Comparative Literature at Harvard.

ALISON LIEBHAFSKY DES FORGES died February 12, 2009, in the crash of Continental Airlines Flight 3407 near Buffalo, New York. She was a leading human-rights activist and one of the world's foremost experts on the Rwandan genocide of 1994. An African history scholar who specialized in Rwanda's colonial period, she served for several years on the faculty of the University of Beijing. In May 1994, several weeks into the slaughter of Rwanda's Tutsi minority by Hutus, with some 200,000 already dead, hers was among the first voices calling for the killings to be officially declared a genocide, which would oblige signatories to the Convention for the Prevention of Genocide to take action to stop it. After Tutsis seized power in Rwanda and the killing ended, she spent four years interviewing both perpetrators and victims of the genocide and, with a MacArthur Foundation grant, wrote the authoritative book on the subject, Leave None to Tell the Story: Genocide in Rwanda, published in 1999. She also testified before the International Criminal Tribunal, based in Tanzania, and at trials in Belgium, Switzerland, the Netherlands, and Canada. Closer to home, she worked for many years to integrate and improve Buffalo's inner-city schools. She leaves her husband, Roger, a daughter, Jessie, Ed.M. '00, a son, Alexander '92, and a brother, Douglas Liebhafsky '62.

WILLIAM HARDY LLOYD died April 26, 2009, in Salt Lake City, Utah. He spent seventeen years in Tennessee developing real estate and outlet malls before returning to Salt Lake City, his hometown. There he joined Medical Priority Consultants, helping to create an international standard for police, fire, and medical dispatch systems. Devoted to the Mormon Church, he served as a missionary in Paris, as a bishop (twice), and as a stake president. He leaves his wife, Yvonne "Bonnie" (Vernon), three daughters, Tiffany Packard, Merrilee Gottfredson, and Ivey Mitchell, three sons, Marty, Sheffield, and Weston '97, a sister, Lynette Brooks, and a brother, Jon.

KATHERINE JEAN LUBART died October 21, 1975. The daughter of David and Muriel V. (Alpert) Lubart, she was born February 29, 1944, in Brooklyn, New York. Lubart came to Radcliffe with our Class and received her AB in 1964 after which she went on to become a Fellow at Columbia University's molecular biology department.

ANDREW CHARLES LUTHER, JR. of Cincinnati died June 11, 1998. He was the former director of operations for The Williamson Co., a Cincinnati manufacturer of heating and cooling systems. Earlier he served as chairman of acquisitions and mergers at Casper Industries Inc. and as a consultant to Intelligence Direction, contractors to the Department of Defense.

JAMES FRANCIS LYNCH, JR. died March 26, 1998, at Shady Side, Maryland. The son of James Francis and Doris L. (Kirber) Lynch, he was born November 19, 1942, in Cambridge, MA. He prepared at Watertown High School, Watertown, MA, before coming to Harvard, where he earned an AB, cum laude, as of our Class. As an undergraduate, Dr. Lynch studied geology and continued his studies in that field for two years as a graduate student at the University of California, Berkeley. However, before completing his graduate work, he switched fields and eventually received his PhD in zoology. Dr. Lynch's area of expertise was evolutionary biology and terrestrial ecology, and he spent his career studying tropical amphibians, reptiles, and birds. He made numerous research trips to the western United States, Mexico, Central America, and the West Indies. In 1974, Dr. Lynch was hired as a research ecologist at the Smithsonian Institution's Chesapeake Bay Center for Environmental Studies. He remained with the Smithsonian for the rest of his career, during which time he wrote approximately sixty scientific and technical articles about ecology and conservation. His research eventually began to focus most closely on the consequences to migratory bird populations of loss of habitat, which in turn led him to work on behalf of conservation efforts in North America, Australia, and Africa. He was survived by his wife, Lindal McCann-Lynch, his mother, and two brothers.

JOHN ALAN MAHANEY died February 1, 1998, at Exeter, New Hampshire. He was born the son of William Fortune and Marion (Evans) Mahaney on December 23, 1941, in Biddeford, ME. He prepared at Phillips Exeter Academy, Exeter, New Hampshire, before coming to Harvard, where he earned an AB, cum laude, in 1964. Throughout his years at Harvard, Mr. Mahaney was a member of the track team and won the New England interscholastic pole vault championship twice. During his junior year he traveled to England with a combined Harvard-Yale track team to compete against the Oxford-Cambridge team. Following graduation, Mr. Mahaney joined the Navy as a supply corps officer and was discharged in 1967 as a lieutenant, junior grade. He then enrolled at the University of Virginia Law School, where he was awarded a JD in 1970.With his training completed, Mr. Mahaney moved back to New England to work for the Boston-based law firm of Ely, Bartlett, Brown & Proctor, where he later became a partner when that firm merged with Gaston, Snow, Motley & Holt. Returning to his home state of Maine in 1987, Mr. Mahaney joined the Portland firm of Drummond, Woodsum, Plimpton & MacMahon, where he directed its commercial real estate department. In 1994, he again returned to Boston to accept a position as senior counsel to the Old Republic National Title Insurance Company. Mr. Mahaney was a member of both the Massachusetts and Maine Bar Associations. Mr. Mahaney was survived by his children, Jennifer Tuohy and Christopher, from his marriage to Carolyn Webster, and Lauren, from his marriage to Carla Buerig; his mother; two brothers, William F. and Evan E.; and his fiancee, Mary H. Thompson.

RICHARD ARLYN MARKS died October 15, 2010, in New York, New York. He was born in Champaign, Illinois, on January 15, 1942, and attended Iowa City (Iowa) High School. An Eliot House resident and Phillips Brooks House volunteer while at Harvard, he received his AB, cum laude in general studies, in 1965. He then entered Harvard Medical School, completing his MD in 1968. After finishing a surgical residency at Roosevelt Hospital in Manhattan, he fulfilled his military obligation as an army surgeon at Fort Lee, Virginia. A general and vascular surgeon, he worked for many years as a senior attending surgeon and vice chairman of the Department of Surgery at St. Luke's- Roosevelt Hospital and a clinical professor of surgery at the Columbia College of Physicians and Surgeons. He was founding president of the St. Luke's-Roosevelt Physicians Organization. He was survived by his wife of thirty-eight years, Roni (Smith); two daughters, Rebecca '99 and Jo Anna; a son, Michael; and two grandchildren.

RICHARD ALLEN MATHER died July 15, 2005, in Spokane, Washington. He served as an army chaplain in Vietnam and later was a Christian Science practitioner and teacher for more than a quarter century. He leaves his wife, June (Wilson), six sons, David, Timothy, Christopher, Jonathan, Jeremy, and Paul, and his former wife, Jane (Joki).

CHARLES ELIOT McCLENNEN, MAT '65, died January 13, 2007, in New Hartford, New York. A former member of Harvard's lightweight varsity crew, he was Kenan professor of geology at Colgate University, where he had taught for more than three decades. He chaired both his department and the Division of Natural Sciences and Mathematics at Colgate and twice served as associate dean of the faculty. An expert on environmental analysis and water-sediment interaction, he attracted international attention for his work on the canals of Venice, spotlighted on the PBS show Nova. In 2000 he was awarded the first Doherty Chair in Ocean Studies by the Sea Education Association in Woods Hole. He was active for many years in the Hamilton, New York, community, serving on the county soil and water conservation board, the planning board, and the school board. He leaves his wife, Hannah (Norseen), a daughter, Alexandra Dohan, a son, Aaron, his father, Alan '38, a sister, Eliza, and two brothers, Alan '61 and Walter '67.

DAVID KOCH McMULLEN died January 24, 2000. Born November 5, 1942, in Gunnison, Colorado, he left Harvard after his freshman year. He later earned a master's degree at the University of Illinois and worked for some years as a free-lance writer in Virginia. No further information on his career or survivors was available.

MARY HELEN McPEEK CALLAHAN died February 1, 2012, in Newark, Delaware. The daughter of Miles and Helen Bucknam McPeek, she was born March 28, 1942, in Alexandria, Virginia. She lived in South House while at Radcliffe and received her AB, magna cum laude in history, with the Class in 1964, followed by an MAT at the Harvard Graduate School of Education in 1966. She worked for more than three decades at the University of Delaware, first as a member of the professional staff of the College of Urban Affairs and later in the Dean's Office of its successor, the College of Human Resources, Education and Public Policy. She served as executive director of the Urban Affairs Association for twenty-five years. She retired in 2008. She was a past president of the League of Women Voters and sang in several choral groups at the university, most recently the Schola Cantorum. A longtime, active member of St. Thomas Episcopal Church in Newark, she was a member of the vestry, taught Sunday school, and sang in the choir. She was a past president of the Harvard Club of Delaware and active for a dozen years on its Schools and Scholarships Committee. She was an avid world traveler. She was survived by her husband of forty-seven years, Raymond, PhD '67; a daughter, Sarah; a son, Brian; two brothers, Jack and Miles McPeek '59, EdM '62; and two grandchildren.

JAMES STEPHEN MERRILL of Bridgewater, New Jersey, died April 7, 2006. He was born August 1, 1942, in New York City and prepared at Phillips Exeter Academy. A resident of Winthrop House while at Harvard, he was a member of the Hasty Pudding, the Phoenix Club, Phillips Brooks House, and St. Paul Church; he received his AB with the Class in 1964. He began his career in investment banking in New York and later worked as an insurance company executive. His survivors include three sons, Andrew '01, Scott, and Keith.

DEAN BRYANT MITCHELL died in March of 1991. He was born on January 2, 1942, in Phoenix, AZ. He prepared at West Phoenix High School and received an AB, cum laude, in 1964 with our Class. Mitchell was a resident of Winthrop House. He worked as a clinical psychologist with adolescents after receiving his PhD in 1969 from the University of Chicago. In his 25th Report, Mitchell wrote that he was working as a free- lance organizational development and management consultant. He said he intended to become more involved with the psychology of the workplace. He listed membership in numerous professional organizations including the American Psychological Association and the Arizona State Psychological Association. He had been named Psychologist of the Year by the Arizona State Bar Association in 1986 and had been president of the County Psychological Society. Mitchell had been formerly married to Patricia A. Wiklund and had a son, Jason.

GERRY F. MOLINA died October 22, 2004, in Newburyport, MA. He was a longtime newspaperman; after graduating he took a job as city-hall reporter for the Newburyport Daily News. In 1973 he joined the Eagle-Tribune, serving the communities of the Merrimack Valley, and went on to hold several posts there, including metro editor, Sunday editor, and managing editor. He became editor of the Haverhill Gazette in 1998, after it was acquired by Eagle-Tribune Publishing. He leaves his wife, Margaret (Hay), and a son, Christopher.

JERRY JOSEPH MRIZEK died January 12, 1996, at Willowbrook, Illinois. The son of Jerry Charles and Beverly Marie (Paulik) Mrizek, he was born September 8, 1942, in Chicago, IL. He prepared at St. Procopius Academy, Lisle, IL, before coming to Harvard, where he received an AB, magna cum laude, in 1964. Mr. Mrizek went on to study law at the University of Chicago, where he received his J.D. in 1967. After completing law school, he practiced law in Chicago until 1970, when he was appointed as an assistant state's attorney for Cook County, Illinois, a position he held until 1974. Mr. Mrizek then moved to Hinsdale, IL, where he and a partner started a firm, Mrizek & Norris. From 1977 to 1984, Mr. Mrizek was the chairman of the Know Your Legal Rights Adult Education Program and, for two years, he also served as editor of the General Practice Section Newsletter for the Illinois State Bar Association. Mr. Mrizek was a member of the Illinois Bar Association, the DuPage County Bar Association, and the Bohemian Lawyers Association of Chicago. Beginning in 1983, he was president and trustee of the Police Pension Fund of the Village of Willowbrook, Illinois. Survivors include his wife, Joyce K. (Davis), to whom he was married on April 27, 1967, and his sons, Jerry Davis and Michael Joseph.

LAWRENCE GEORGE MULLEN II died December 23, 1966, at Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. The son of Lawrence George and Rita (White) Mullen, he was born July 26, 1942, in Cambridge, Massachusetts. He attended Rindge Technical School, Cambridge, Massachusetts, before coming to Harvard where he received an AB in 1965, as of our Class. He was a resident of Dudley House. He was survived by his mother.

HELEN JEAN NEWMAN SOLL died January 6, 1972. The daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Sol Newman of Joplin, Missouri, she concentrated on biology and was a resident of North House. She was a member of the Freshman Chorus and the Harvard Outing Club. She received an AB cum laude in 1964.

CHRISTIAN LUGER OHIRI died November 7, 1966, at Owerri, East Nigeria, where he was born June 19, 1938, the son of William and Therese (Anyanwu) Ohiri. He attended Holy Ghost College in Owerri, before coming to Harvard where he received an AB magna cum laude in 1964 and attended the Business School. While at Harvard College, Chris resided in Eliot House and set a school record of forty-seven goals during his three years on the soccer team. He excelled at track and won a medal while participating for Nigeria in the 1960 Olympics at Rome and also took part in the 1964 Olympics in Tokyo. Chris was the 1964 Intercollegiate Association of Amateur Athletes of America Triple Jump champion. He was married to Shirley Ann Witherspoon of New York City.

JAN STERLING PALMER died October 19, 2000, in Philadelphia. He was first vice president of Salomon Smith Barney in Philadelphia, where he worked as a stockbroker for thirty-two years, and a member of the board of directors of Paoli Memorial Hospital. He was a former officer of the Harvard Club of Philadelphia. He leaves his wife, Lynn (Sweetwood), two sons, David and Scott, and a sister, Carolyn Sugalski.

ELEANOR HORTENSE PEARSON died February 12, 1977, at New York, New York. The daughter of Gaynor and Ellen Maria (Maki) Pearson, she was born January 14, 1943, in Washington, DC. She prepared at Northfield School for Girls in Northfield, Massachusetts, before receiving her AB at Radcliffe. Pearson continued her education at the Institute of Fine Arts, where she was a Ford Foundation Fellow and worked on the editorial board of Marsyas: Studies in the History of Art, serving as editor in chief for volume fifteen. She earned an MA in 1975 from the Institute and was working on her PhD at the time of her death. Pearson worked for a time with the Society for the Preservation of New England Antiquities in Boston, followed by employment with the Cambridge (Massachusetts) Historical Commission, where she co-authored the Survey of Architectural History in Cambridge, Volume II: Mid-Cambridge. At the American Heritage Publishing Company, Pearson copy-edited their third volume of the History of American Antiques. She also held a curatorship for the private art collection of Jean Whitney Payson and taught art history at the School of Visual Arts in New York. Other professional writings included nine entries in the catalog of The Annenberg Collection, Tate Gallery, London, and a book review on the architect W.R. Emerson published in the Journal of the Society of Architectural Historians. She was survived by her parents and a brother, Robert.

BRUCE HERBERT PECHEUR died August 16, 1973, at New York City. He was born April 28, 1942, in Syosset, New York, the son of Herbert Eugene Pecheur. He prepared at Syosset School and received an AB degree at Harvard in 1964. After teaching for a short while, Pecheur moved to New York City in order to pursue a career in acting. He had several small parts in films and had appeared in Andy Warhol's movie, "Trash," as well as in several off-Broadway plays. He had also appeared in several nationally televised commercials and in advertisements published in such magazines as The New Yorker and Esquire. His latest assignment had been the cover of the June, 1973, issue of Mens Wear. Pecheur was killed in his home while trying to prevent a burglary; he was survived by his wife, Lucy.

BRADFORD KENT PERRY died May 30, 2000, in Epping, New Hampshire. He was vice chancellor for financial affairs and treasurer in the New Hampshire university system, which includes UNH, Plymouth State College, Keene State College, and the College for Lifelong Learning. Earlier he worked at Stanford University as associate controller and director of accounting. He received the Navy Commendation Medal for his service as an officer in the Navy Supply Corps from 1964 to 1971. He leaves his wife, Marilyn (Scott), two daughters, Katherine Kendig and Susan Lang, a stepbrother, Mark Fellows, and a stepsister, Nancy Tousch.

WARREN ALAN PETERSEN died June 24, 2013, in Grand Junction, Colorado. Born June 27, 1942, in Lincoln, Nebraska, he was the son of Fred and Wretha Kline Petersen. He graduated from Bethesda-Chevy Chase High School, in Bethesda, Maryland. He was a Dunster House resident and member of the Harvard-Radcliffe Organ Society while at Harvard and received his AB in 1965. He then earned an MD at the University of Colorado. A general surgeon, he maintained a practice in Grand Junction, working at all the local hospitals, before closing his office in 1997. Despite several illnesses in the ensuing years, he continued to assist in surgeries until late 2012. In 1998 he fulfilled his dream of becoming a farmer, moving to a property where he enjoyed the pleasures and rigors of animal husbandry, growing hay, fixing fences, and maintaining pastures. Formerly an avid camper and hiker, in recent years he continued to explore the backcountry on the back of his favorite mule, Babe, riding her along mountain and desert trails until the last months of his life. He was survived by his wife of twenty-seven years, Shari (Raso); four sons, Kaj, Jens, Dirk, and Jack; two brothers, Chris and Lance; and three grandchildren.

IVER ECHART PETERSON died from an infection on August 1, 2012, in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania; he had been treated for cancer. Born in Brattleboro, Vermont, on June 6, 1942, he was the son of Oliver and Esther Peterson. He prepared at the Middlesex School, in Concord, Massachusetts. While at Harvard he lived in Eliot House, belonged to the Porcellian Club, and lettered in varsity lightweight crew, receiving his AB, cum laude in English, in 1965. After graduation he joined the New York Times as a clerk for James Reston, the Washington Bureau chief, but soon left for Vietnam to work there for the US Agency for International Development. Rejoining the Times while still in Saigon, he became one of a generation of young journalists who earned distinction as war correspondents in Vietnam. After returning to the States he reported from Detroit and Denver and later covered New York and New Jersey politics, as well as education, real estate, and automobiles. He spoke Swedish, French, Spanish, Vietnamese, and Arabic. In 2006-07 he served as public affairs officer for the Iraqi police program at the International Police Training Center in Jordan. A vintage car buff and talented mechanic, after retiring from the Times in 2005 he took to the open road and freelanced travel stories; his most recent posting was "The Time Traveler with Tailfins," about his adventures driving cross-country on Route 50 in his 1958 Cadillac Eldorado Biarritz. A first marriage to Nancy Moran '66 ended in divorce. He was survived by his wife of thirty-four years, Christine (Roberts); two daughters, Kelicia Sparano and Holly; two sons, Heath and Lars; a sister, Karen Wilken; two brothers, Eric '61 and Lars '68; and five grandchildren.

ERIC WILLIAM PETRASKE died March 19, 2006, in Danbury, Connecticut. He was born in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, on October 6, 1942, and prepared at Phillips Academy, Andover. He lived in Dunster House at Harvard, receiving his AB with the Class in 1964. He completed a PhD in physics at the University of Minnesota in 1967 and then pursued a postdoctoral fellowship in high-energy physics at Stanford University. Later he switched his career from science to law, acquiring a JD at Boston University in 1976. He was self-employed as a patent attorney in New York City. He was survived by his wife, Edda (Wiesmer); a son, Stefan; a sister, Elisabeth Bertsch; and a brother, Alan.

EUGENIA ROSE PLUNKETT died October 15, 1995, at Fort Smith, Arkansas. Ms. Plunkett attended Radcliffe from 1960 through 1961 and during that time was a resident of South House and a member of the tennis team. A businesswoman, she was involved in directing the Fort Smith-based Plunkett Distributing Company. She was survived by her brother, Robert, and her niece, Leigh Whitaker Plunkett '99.

THOMAS WALTER POHL died on December 28, 1991 in New Orleans, Louisiana. He was born on March 28, 1942, in Danzig, Germany. He prepared at Easton High School in Pennsylvania and received an AB, cum laude, in 1965 as of our Class. Pohl received a Master's degree from Columbia University in 1966 and a PhD in geography from the University of Washington. He taught for several years at Lehman College in New York City. He was the son of Alice L. Patzke Pohl and Hans Pohl of Germany. He was survived by his mother.

THOMAS JOSEPH PORTER died January 19, 2013, in St. Augustine, Florida. He was born July 25, 1943, in Southampton, New York. While at Harvard he was resident of Kirkland House and a member of Phillips Brooks House and St. Paul Church, and he received his AB in 1971. He worked for the Suffolk County (New York) Probation Department, on Long Island, for thirty-seven years, retiring as deputy director in 2009. He was a past president of the Suffolk County Police Benevolent Association. A natural athlete who competed in football, baseball, and wrestling in his youth, he later played a lot of golf and softball. He was a master bridge player and a sailor, and he loved his dogs. He was survived by his wife of forty-eight years, Georgiana; two daughters, Kelly Hirsch and Maura Kuehl; three sons, Thomas, Matthew, and Michael; and six grandchildren. A daughter, Kimberly Ann, and a son, Sean, predeceased him.

YVONNE QUINLAN died of congestive heart failure on November 28, 2009, in Boston, Massachusetts. Born in Boston on July 20, 1943, she attended Cambridge High and Latin School. She lived in South House while at Radcliffe and volunteered with Phillips Brooks House, receiving her AB in English with the Class in 1964. An ardent supporter of civil rights, in the spring of freshman year she took part in the picketing of Woolworth stores in Cambridge in solidarity with the black students who were then staging their lunch-counter sit-ins in the South, and she took a keen interest in feminist issues and the women's movement all her life. She worked at Harvard as a secretary for some years, first in the Registrar's Office and later in the Department of Government. She was a lover of literature, especially the novels of Anthony Trollope, and of cats. She was survived by a brother, Guy '60, JD '63.

DANIEL MOOAR RADCLIFFE died November 29, 1977, at Washington, DC. The son of Alex G.B. Radcliffe, he was born October 29, 1942, in Mineola, Long Island, New York. He prepared at North Miami High School, Miami, Florida, and received his AB from Harvard. A member of Hasty Pudding and Speakers, he resided in Dunster House. After graduation, Radcliffe entered the U.S. Army, serving as a courier with the Adjutant General's Corps. Law school followed, and in 1969 he earned a JD from the University of Virginia. Radcliffe worked for both the Civil Aeronautics Board and the Department of Housing and Urban Development before joining the Department of Interstate Commerce, where he served for five years as a senior attorney-advisor. He was survived by his parents.

STEPHEN JAMES RALLIS died April 17, 2012, in Columbus, Ohio. He was born in Bennington, Vermont, on May 17, 1942, the son of Jimmy and Vickie Rallis, and attended Bennington High School. At Harvard he was a Winthrop House resident and Phi Beta Kappa, receiving his AB, magna cum laude in mathematics, in 1964. He completed his PhD at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in 1968. A professor of mathematics at Ohio State University, he was considered one of the world's most original minds in the fields of algebraic number theory and representation theory. After MIT he spent two years at Princeton's Institute for Advanced Study and two years at the State University of New York, Stony Brook, followed by visiting positions at the Universities of Strasbourg, Texas, and Notre Dame, as well as Princeton. He joined the OSU faculty in 1977 and became a professor emeritus in 2008. Known in the mathematical community for his creative approaches to very deep problems, he focused much of his research on the Siegel-Weil formula, seeking to put it in a more general context, and on L-functions. Several fundamental formulas or methods in the field of automorphic forms are named after him: the Rallis inner product formula, the Rallis tower phenomenon, the Piatetski-Shapiro and Rallis doubling method, the Jacquet-Rallis relative trace formula, and the automorphic descent method of Ginzburg-Rallis-Soudry. His doctoral thesis has been cited more than three hundred times. He was invited to speak on his work at the 1990 International Congress of Mathematics, held in Kyoto, Japan—a signal honor for a mathematician—and also to give the prestigious Schur Lectures at Tel Aviv University. He was survived by his wife of forty-two years, Michele (Kaufman) '62, PhD '68, and two sisters, Nancy Rallis and Diane Conover.

ARCHIBALD JAMES REARK of Cromer, Victoria, Australia, died May 8, 2012. He was born October 5, 1940, in Melbourne, where he attended Mentone Grammar School. A Winthrop House resident and Pi Eta member while at Harvard, he spent just two years with the Class, returning to Australia after sophomore year and finishing his undergraduate degree, a BEc, at Monash University in Melbourne in 1966. In a varied business career, he was chairman and managing director of Reark Research Pty. Ltd., a management consulting firm; founder of RAMIS Corporation, a market research company; and principal of Jim Reark and Partners, a media, marketing, and advertising firm in Melbourne. He was former chairman of the Market Research Society of Australia. He loved golf; he was also an ardent auto racing buff and past president of the Maserati Club of Australia. The Class has no current information about his surviving family; in the Fifteenth Anniversary Report he listed a wife, Dianne Gray, and three children, Zachary, Sarah, and Ruth.

ROBERT MATTHEW REIDY died June 17, 2004, in Newton Centre, Massachusetts. He was a telecommunications specialist and longtime Newton resident. He leaves two sisters, Gail Bell and Mary Louise, and four brothers, Maurice, Edward, Joseph, and Philip.

JOHN ALDEN RICE died December 31, 1982, at Hawaii. The son of Elmer and Betty (Field) Rice, he was born November 29, 1942, in New York, New York. He received his AB from Harvard in 1964. Our Classmate, John Pitman Weber, provided the following information about his life. "After Harvard, Rice spent a few years in the Peace Corps in Tunisia, perfecting his Arabic. On his return he worked first with the U.N. as a simultaneous translator, then with the Farmworkers Union in California, where he met his wife. He became a lawyer and continued to work for the Farmworkers, the OEO, etc. and was active in antinuclear campaigns. At the time of his death he was working for Taylor, Roth Hunt in Los Angeles." Rice was survived by his wife, the former Celia Trujillo, and two children.

ANNE MAUREEN RICHARDSON died October 2, 2013, in Emeryville, California. She was born in Berkeley, California, on December 22, 1942, and graduated from Berkeley High School. A resident of Moors Hall while at Radcliffe and fifth-chair cellist in the Harvard-Radcliffe Orchestra, she was forced to withdraw from the College in junior year on account of illness and completed her BA at the University of California, Berkeley, in 1965. She went on to earn her MA and PhD in English from Yale, in 1966 and 1976, respectively, and an MLS from the School of Library and Information Studies at the University of California, Berkeley, in 1978. She taught English at Albertus Magnus College and George Washington University. She was also an independent scholar who focused her life's work on the writings of William Tyndale (1494-1536), Bible translator and leader of the English Reformation. She was the author many articles and essays on Tyndale, and a multivolume series of critical editions she coedited, The Independent Works of William Tyndale, was published by Catholic University of America Press beginning in 2000. She was active in the Modern Language Association, the William Tyndale Society, The Amici Thomae Mori (Friends of Thomas More), and the Bay Area independent scholars' organization, the Institute for Historical Study. An accomplished amateur cellist, she continued to enjoy playing chamber music throughout much of her life. A 1965 marriage to Roger George Swearingen ended in divorce in 1969. She leaves a sister, Courtney Simson.

ANTHONY RICHARD RIOLO died March 28, 1989, at Albuquerque, New Mexico. He received his AB cum laude in 1964 and his LL.B. in 1968. At the time of the Twenty-Fifth Anniversary Report, Riolo was the Assistant General Director of the Santa Fe Opera, Santa Fe, New Mexico.

LESLIE ALLEN RISEBERG died February 22, 2001, in New York City. A telecommunications executive, he most recently served as chief technology officer and executive vice president of KMC Telecom in Bedminster, New Jersey. Previously he worked as a research scientist and later a vice president at GTE Laboratories, Inc., in Waltham, Massachusetts. While living in Sudbury, Massachusetts, he was active on the conservation commission. He leaves his wife, Marilyn (Oxman), a daughter, Jocelyn Scheirer, a son, Andrew, his mother, Mollie, and two sisters, Elaine Cooperman and Anita Krivis.

DAVID JOHN RITTENHOUSE died of cancer on August 16, 2011, in North Hatley, Quebec, Canada. He was born in Montreal on March 7, 1943, and attended Montreal West High School. A Quincy House resident while at Harvard, he was a member of the varsity track team, Hasty Pudding Club, and WHRB staff and received his AB, magna cum laude in English, in 1964. In 1966 he completed a BPhil at the University of Oxford. He was a professor of drama and department chairman at Bishop's University, in Lennoxville, Quebec, where he was the driving force in the creation of the drama and entrepreneurship programs and a founder of Festival Lennoxville, a summer festival of Canadian plays. In recent years he also helped establish a foundation to conserve lands in the Massawippi Valley for the enjoyment of future generations. He was survived by his wife, Donnie; two daughters, Andrea and Heidi; a son, Matheson; a sister, Trixi; a brother, Jonathan; and three grandchildren.

RUSSELL BREWSTER ROBERTS died May 21, 1989 in Washington, DC. The son of John Thomas Roberts and Lucile Bailey Roberts, he was born July 8, 1942, in Atlanta, Georgia. He prepared at Naramasu High School, Tokyo, Japan. He attended Harvard through his junior year with our Class. He was a resident of Lowell House, a member of the Young Democrats Club, the Historian Society, a staff member of the Crimson, and a contributing writer in the Harvard Crimson Anthology. After leaving Harvard, he spent seven years in the White House during the Kennedy and Johnson Administrations. He was a top aide in the Peace Corps, then in consumer affairs. He was also one of President Johnson's speech writers. After leaving the White House, he worked as a television writer and commentator on consumer affairs and as a free lance writer. Roberts was survived by his mother, a sister, Penelope Roberts Lovelace, and a brother, Thomas Bailey Roberts.

HUGH DUNBAR ROBERTSON died August 22, 2005, in New York, New York. He was born in Boston, Massachusetts, on June 12, 1943, and prepared at Saint Albans School, in Washington, DC. A resident of Winthrop House, he received his AB in biology, magna cum laude, with the Class in 1964. While pursuing his PhD in life sciences at Rockefeller University, completed in 1969, he acquired an interest in RNA and its role in living systems, and this became the focus of his groundbreaking research career. After three years of postdoctoral research at the Medical Research Council Laboratory of Molecular Biology, in Cambridge, England, he returned to Rockefeller University as an assistant professor of molecular genetics in 1972. In 1988 he moved across the street to Cornell University Medical College, where he remained a professor of biochemistry until his death. His first major discovery was the bacterial enzyme RNase III, which became the founding member of a class of nucleases central to the RNA interference phenomenon in plants and animals. In recent years he had concentrated his research on the hepatitis C virus (HCV), a virus with an RNA genome. A lover of choral singing all his life, he was a member of the Glee Club while at Harvard and later a longtime member and past president of the Canterbury Choral Society, in New York City. For many years he was also a board member of the Christodora Charitable Foundation, which helps low-income city youth develop their potential through direct experience in nature. He was survived by his wife of thirty-seven years, Janet (Abernethy); two sons, Andrew and Michael; and a grandson.

ROBERT EMMETT ROBERTSON III of Baltimore, Maryland, died April 19, 2007. He was born in Baltimore on April 19, 1942, and prepared at Saint Paul's School, in Brooklandville, Maryland. He lived in Kirkland House while at Harvard and was a member of the lightweight crew, ROTC, and the Hasty Pudding. He received his AB with the Class in 1964. He served in the army for four years after graduation, engaged in intelligence coordination, policy, and planning in the Middle East, Europe, and the Caribbean. After concluding his military service he spent several years working for the State Department and then for the Department of Energy, where he was involved in developing and staffing international projects in the Middle East and Europe. More recently he was managing director of a strategic and financial consulting firm in Baltimore, Equity Development Group, where his work encompassed international and government relations, strategic planning, venture capital and other finance, and historic preservation efforts. The Class has no information on his surviving family at this time.

MARILYN ROBINSON WALDMAN died July 8, 1996. The daughter of Morris and Sophia (Shwifl) Robinson, she was born April 13, 1943, in Dallas, Texas. Dr. Waldman prepared at Hillcrest High School, Dallas, Texas, before coming to Radcliffe. A resident of East House, Dr. Waldman received an AB, summa cum laude, as of our Class. After graduation, she pursued graduate study in history, both at the University of London and the University of Chicago, receiving an MA in 1966 and a PhD in 1974. While finishing her dissertation, Dr. Waldman began teaching for Ohio State University's history department. During her years at Harvard, Dr. Waldman focused primarily on African history, but later her research expanded to include Arabic and Iranian subjects as well as Islamic historiography, the history of religions, and comparative humanities. From 1979 through 1980, she directed Ohio State's Near and Middle Eastern Studies Program, and later, in 1981, she was appointed director of its Center for Comparative Studies. Dr. Waldman was a dedicated public speaker and was most sought after for her expertise in Middle Eastern and Islamic topics following the 1980 Iranian revolution. Dr. Waldman was survived by her husband, Loren K., to whom she was married in August 1963, and her daughter, Amy Laura.

PETER WARREN RODMAN died August 2, 2008, in Baltimore, Maryland. He was born in Boston on November 24, 1943, the son of Sumner Rodman '35 and Helen Rodman, and prepared at the Roxbury Latin School. He was a Kirkland House resident and Phi Beta Kappa at Harvard, receiving his AB in government, summa cum laude, at the top of the class in 1964. He earned a master's degree at the University of Oxford in 1966 and a JD back at Harvard in 1969. He was about to take a job at a New York law firm when he got a call from Henry Kissinger '50, then national security advisor and his former senior thesis advisor, summoning him to Washington to become his special assistant. He went on to serve as a foreign policy expert under five Republican presidents, from Richard Nixon to George W. Bush, helping to shape US initiatives in national security and defense for nearly four decades. From 2001 to 2007, he was assistant secretary of defense for international security affairs under secretary of defense Donald Rumsfeld. He left government service in 2007 to become a senior fellow at the Brookings Instition, where he researched and wrote a book, Presidential Command: Power, Leadership, and the Making of Foreign Policy from Richard Nixon to George W. Bush, published posthumously in 2009. His other books include More Precious Than Peace: The Cold War and the Struggle for the Third World, America Adrift: A Strategic Assessment, and Uneasy Giant:Challenges to American Predominance. He was also a former senior editor of the National Review. He was an ardent Red Sox fan. He leaves his wife, Veronique (Bouland), whom he married in 1980; a daughter, Theodora; a son, Nicholas; his parents; and a brother.

THOMAS EDWARD SANDERSON died December 15, 1963, at Hingham, Massachusetts. He was born July 28, 1935, in New Haven, Connecticut, the son of Thomas and Dorothy (Fallow) Sanderson. He attended St. Mary's High School in New Haven before coming to Harvard where he spent three years with our Class. While at Harvard he resided in Dudley House. Tom was serving in the USNR, with the rank of lieutenant commander, when he was killed in the crash of an anti-submarine tracker plane which went out of control and plunged into a marshy woodland section of Hingham. He was survived by his parents.

RONALD WILLIAM SANDVEN died June 29, 2013, in Sheboygan, Wisconsin. The son of Reuben and Rhea Sandven, he was born in Havre, Montana, on April 21, 1942, and attended Dubuque (Iowa) High School. He lived in Dunster House while at Harvard and received his AB with the Class in 1964. In 1965 he earned an MA at the University of Wisconsin, Madison. After a teaching internship at North High School in Sheboygan, he remained there for thirtyfour years as a history teacher and a coach in football, wrestling, and girls' and boys' tennis. He retired in 1999. He enjoyed skiing, tennis, biking, golf, and windsurfing and was a passionate sailor; in retirement he and his wife spent a good deal of time in Florida to pursue outdoor activities year round. He also loved listening to music and playing chess. A first marriage to Jill (Bredlow) ended in divorce. He was survived by his wife of twenty-five years, Cindy (Joa); three daughters, Deborah, Jennifer, and Melissa Kuehl; two stepchildren, Aaron Radder and Brooke Laufer; a sister, Kari; three grandchildren; and two step-grandchildren.

GEORGE LEE SARGENT, JR. died of cancer on January 25, 2013, in Cornelius, North Carolina. Born in Boston on January 19, 1943, the son of George Lee and Hester Lloyd Sargent, he prepared at St. Paul's School, in Concord, New Hampshire. He lived in Winthrop House and lettered in ice hockey at Harvard, where he was also a member of the Owl Club and played baseball; his pitching record—a 0.42 earned run average for the Ivy League champion Crimson team in 1964—still stands. He received his AB with the Class in 1964. He joined the marine corps after graduation, earning the Purple Heart for his service as a forward observer in Vietnam and rising to the rank of captain. In 1967 he joined Noble and Greenough School in Dedham and served for seventeen years there as a history teacher, athletic director, football coach, and assistant hockey coach. Nobles won the Independent School League football championship five times during his years as coach. His teams won fifty of the last fifty-six games he coached, for an overall record of 88-17. He was also a driving force in the expansion of the Independent School League in the 1970s. From 1967 until 1975 he was also treasurer and then executive vice president of the New England Patriots, of which his father, George, was an original co-owner. He spent the early 1980s at Tufts University, coaching football and baseball while pursuing an MA in Soviet and Eastern European studies, completed in 1983. In 1986 he joined the football staff of Davidson College, in North Carolina, under head coach Vic Gatto '69. He continued to be a fine all-around athlete in his own right, excelling in tennis (was a former member of the Junior Davis Cup tennis team), golf, and running (represented the United States at the World Masters Games in Rome in 1985 and ran several marathons). After retiring from college coaching, he remained at Davidson as a director of game management operations director. He was also a regional and Final Four basketball tournament director for the NCAA. He was president of Be Active North Carolina, a nonprofit promoting an active lifestyle for all ages. His first wife, Judith (Forte), whom he married in 1964, died in 1974. He was survived by his wife of twenty years, Janet (Wages); a daughter, Kimberly Hurtado; two sons, George "Trip" and David; a stepson, Matthew Manning; three sisters, Fordie Madeira, Nancy Green, and Wendy Anderson; and four grandchildren.

OLIVIA SCHIEFFELIN NORDBERG died on May 3, 1996. The daughter of Bayard and Virginia (Loomis) Schieffelin, she was born on February 2, 1942, in Washington, DC. Dr. Nordberg prepared at the Kent Place School, Summit, NJ, before attending Radcliffe, where she received an AB, cum laude, as of our Class. Soon after graduation, she moved to New York City, where she began working for Scribner Bookstore. This position quickly led her to a position as an assistant editor of children's books at E. P. Dutton. Dr. Nordberg remained there until 1965, when she became a research assistant for the Population Council, a nonprofit research foundation, where she was quickly promoted as an associate in the demographic division. During this time, Dr. Nordberg decided to pursue a graduate degree at the University of Michigan, where she earned an A.M. in 1968. She then returned to New York, where she became the Population Council's director of publications. A year later she enrolled in a doctoral prograni at Princeton and was awarded her PhD in 1976. While still a student at Princeton, Dr. Nordberg accepted a position with the United Nations as an evaluation officer working on the issue of international population control. Concurrently, she contributed articles to the Dow Jones publication, Amnerican Demographics. Shortly after our Fifteenth Anniversary, Dr. Nordherg was asked to serve on the board of directors for Planned Parenthood of Ness York City and, at that point, she returned to publishing as a senior editor for the magazines Working Mother and Parents. At the time of our Twenty-fifth Anniversary, Dr. Nordberg combined her earlier work in population research with her experience in publishing by accepting a position as director of publications at the Alan Guttmacher Institute. She was editor-in-chief of the institute's periodicals, Family Planning Perspectives and International Family Planning Perspectives. She was survived by her husband, E. Wayne, to whom she was married on April 24, 1971; her son Samuel; her daughter, Anna; and her sister, Barbara Powell.

STEPHEN ADATTO SCHLESINGER died March 25, 1978, at Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. The son of Isadore K. Schlesinger, he was born July 25, 1942, in Pittsburgh, and prepared at the Franklin High School, Seattle, Washington. He received an AB, cum laude, from Harvard in 1964, and four years later earned an MD from Johns Hopkins Medical School. Internship at Boston City Hospital and a psychiatric residency at the University of Pennsylvania (1969-71) and the Philadelphia Psychiatric Center (1971-73) followed. On the completion of his training, Schlesinger served as a consultant to the Philadelphia clinics of the University of Pennsylvania Medical School, and as staff psychiatrist for the Southwest Pittsburgh MR/MR Program (Pittsburgh) and the Woodville State Hospital (Carnegie). He also acted as chief consultant to the Westmoreland Hospital D & A Program, and as supervisor at Westmoreland Clinic. His professional associations included the National Board of Medical Examiners, the Pennsylvania Medical Society, the American Medical Association and the American Psychiatric Association. Schlesinger was survived by his parents and by his sister, Diana.

GEORGE LEWIS SELDEN died March 31, 2011, in Winter Haven, Florida. He was born in Akron, Ohio, on April 7, 1942, and graduated from Oakwood High School in Dayton. A Winthrop House resident, he received his AB, cum laude in general studies, in 1964 and then went on to the Law School, where he completed his JD in 1969 and was a member of the Harvard Law School Drama Society. He worked as an attorney for many years in Manhattan and was a talented jazz pianist. He was survived by a daughter, Emily; a son, Robert; a sister; and a brother.

ELEANOR CLARK "MIMI" SINKLER died July 22, 2006, in Tunbridge, Vermont. She was an elementary-school teacher before becoming operator of Zone V, a photographic chemicals mail-order business based in Maynard, Massachusetts. After moving to Vermont in 1994 she served on the Tunbridge Planning Commission. She was a passionate vegetable gardener who delighted in sharing her produce with friends and neighbors. She leaves a brother, George.

THOMAS VICTOR SIPORIN died of bone cancer on November 15, 2001, in Oakland, California. He was a Bay Area attorney, artist, and activist. Left with an underdeveloped left arm after childhood polio, he nonetheless became an accomplished baseball, soccer, and tennis player. In the 1970s he served as directing attorney for Legal Services in Palo Alto, representing Native Americans at Wounded Knee and the United Farm Workers in the Central Valley, and was an assistant professor of public-interest law at California State University, Chico. He served as executive director of San Fernando Valley Neighborhood Legal Services from 1980 to 1983, when his illness forced him to curtail his practice of law. Turning instead to art, he became a prolific painter whose work was exhibited in more than forty solo and group shows. He also wrote and performed in numerous plays and performance pieces on disability and other socially cogent themes. In 1999 he was selected to exhibit and perform at the Art & Soul World Exhibition in Los Angeles, spotlighting the work of disabled artists from forty nations. A strong advocate for the civil rights of the disabled, he campaigned for passage of the Americans with Disabilities Act and served as a pro bono counsel with the Disability Rights Education and Defense Fund. He leaves his longtime companion, Paula Morgan, his parents, Mary and Seymour, and a brother, Michael.

ROBERT NATHAN SOLLOD of Shaker Heights, Ohio, died October 10, 2005. He was born in Baltimore, Maryland, on February 20, 1942, and prepared at the Gilman School there. He lived in Quincy House at Harvard, receiving his AB, cum laude, in 1965. He completed an MA in existential psychology at Duquesne University in 1970 and his PhD in clinical psychology at Columbia University in 1974. He was an associate professor of psychology at the Ferkauf Graduate School, Yeshiva University, before joining the faculty of Cleveland State University in 1980. At CSU he headed the clinical psychology program for many years and served as director of the department's honors program. He was also active in the faculty union, advocating for the health and welfare of his fellow professors. His published works include many articles and a textbook he coauthored, Beneath the Mask: An Introduction to Theories of Personality, which is considered a major contribution to the field; in later years, especially as he battled his own illness, he studied techniques for integrating spirituality into psychotherapy. He was a board member of the Cleveland Psychological Association and a fellow of the International Academy of Eclectic Psychotherapists. He was survived by his wife, Jeanine Low-Beer, and a sister, Susan Bard.

ADAM NATHANIEL STEINBERG died June 4, 2005, in Abingdon, Virginia. He was born in New York City on December 2, 1942, the son of Israel and Evelyn Steinberg, and prepared at the Horace Mann School there. A resident of Dunster House at Harvard, he received his AB in 1965. After studying and teaching college biology at Long Island University for two years, he entered the Medical College of Virginia, completing his MD in 1971. He followed up an internship and residency at New York Hospital-Cornell Medical Center with two years in rural Appalachia with the National Health Service Corps of the US Public Health Service. He then settled in Abingdon, where he practiced internal medicine for thirtythree years. In addition to his private practice, he served as chief of staff at Johnston Memorial Hospital. He was a member of the Virginia Physicians Review Board and past president of the Washington County Medical Society. He was survived by his wife of thirty-five years, Jean (Deel); two daughters, Elizabeth Steinberg and Amy Hicks; a son, Jordan; a sister, Lisa Ettinger; and a brother, Charles.

LIONEL MAXIMILIAN STERN III died February 19, 2005, in Los Angeles, California. He was born on September 28, 1939. He lived in Dunster House as a sophomore, but in 1963 he left the College and moved to the West Coast. He studied information processing technology at UCLA Extension and then worked for many years as a computer programmer, retiring in 2003 from Myricom, Inc., a California technology firm that helped pioneer the development of cluster computing. He had a lifelong passion for choral singing, most recently as a member of the Los Angeles Zimriyah Chorale, a master choir dedicated to performing Jewish music. He was survived by his wife, Barbara Jampel, whom he married in 1992; his mother, Enid; two sisters, Ginger Fedak and Griffin Toffler; and a brother, Corky.

JOSEPH JOHN STETZ, JR. died December 18, 2004, in Boston, Massachusetts, from injuries suffered in an automobile accident. A varsity swimmer, he qualified for the 1964 Summer Olympic trials, but stayed on the medical school track. He was a cardiothoracic surgeon at St. Elizabeth's Medical Center in Brighton for twenty years before retiring in October 2004. He was a member of the Army Reserve for more than thirty years and a colonel in the Rhode Island National Guard. The owner of a Stetson and several pairs of cowboy boots, he rode his horse of fifteen years, Sassy, several times a week and dreamed of moving to Montana. He leaves two daughters, Jessica and Rebecca, and his former wife, Estelle Manetas.

GEORGE PETER STOKES died July 20, 2007, in Georgia, Vermont. He was an assistant district attorney under future US senator James Jeffords in the Newport District of Vermont in the early 1970s and later opened his own practice in Milton, VT. He was active in the communities of Milton and Colchester, where he was a selectman. Gradually he shifted his interests to real estate, investing in rental properties in Vermont and then in Tucson, where he moved in 1990. He was past president of the Harvard Club of Southern Arizona. He was an avid player of golf, softball, and bridge, a booster of women's college sports, a collector of old cars, and a regular writer of letters to the editor. He leaves his wife, Barbara (Ellison), two daughters, Stacy Stokes and Kendra Flood, a son, Edward, a sister, Andrea Kenney, and a brother, Theodore; his first wife, Sarah (Cooper), predeceased him.

DAVID LEWIS STONE died January 13, 1994, in Bernardsville, New Jersey. He was born on March 2, 1942, in Harrisburg, Pennsylvania. He prepared at Milton Academy, Milton, Massachusetts. He received an AB, cum laude, in 1964 and an MSEE from the University of Pennsylvania in 1967. In 1970 he joined Digital Equipment Corporation and became Vice President of Software and Engineering. He spent fifteen years in Geneva, Switzerland, where he was Vice President of International Engineering. At the time of his death, Stone was president of AT&T's Operations Systems Business unit within AT&T Network Systems. He held a patent on the shared memory management mechanism for the Digital PDP-11/45 and had various technical publications. Stone was survived by his wife, Patricia A. Dugall Stone, his sons, David and Paul, and his daughter, Katherine.

JOSEPH SUYDAM STOUT, JR. died November 29, 1987, at Toronto, Canada. He was born October 6, 1942, in New York, New York, and attended St. Paul's School, Concord, New Hampshire. A resident of Leverett House, he received his AB cum laude and a JD from Columbia University in 1967. Joseph Stout's field of concentration at Harvard was social relations. He was a member of the Hasty Pudding Club and secretary of the Fly Club. At the time of his death, Stout was a lawyer and partner with the firm of Winthrop, Stimson, Putnam and Roberts of New York City. He was survived by his wife Elizabeth Gay Pierce, whom he married on December 28, 1963; by two sons, Joseph Suydam 3d '67 and William Curtis '69; by his parents, Joseph S. and Barbara of Lloyd Harbor, New York; and by a sister, Lydia Dane.

WILLARD ARNOLD SULLIVAN, JR. died May 1, 1998, at Charleston, West Virginia. The son of Willard Arnold and Emma Kathleen (Sims) Sullivan, he was born on July 3, 1942, in Huntington, West Virginia. He prepared at Vinson High School, Huntington, West Virginia, before coming to Harvard, where he earned an AB as of our Class. Following graduation, Mr. Stillivan worked on Wall Street for two years before deciding to enroll at the College of Law, West Virginia University, where he received his JD in 1969. From 1969 to 1979 he served as assistant attorney general of West Virginia. He then accepted a position with the Charleston, West Virginia, law firm of Campbell, Love, Woodroe & Kizer, where he was named a partner in 1974. By the time of our Twentieth Anniversary, Mr. Sullivan had left his original firm and, with a partner, opened the law firm Sullivan & Cowen. Within five years, however, he was running a solo practice in Charleston. He has served as the director of the Army-Navy Club and was a member of the American Bar Association, the West Virginia Bar Association, the West Virginia State Bar, and the Edgewood Country Club. Mr. Sullivan is the author of "An Extraordinary Rule: Rule XVIII, Rules of Practice in the Supreme Court of West Virginia," published in the West Virginia Review and of "Extraordinary Remedies -- Introduction to Procedure in the Courts of West Virginia," published in the West Virginia Practice Handbook. He also taught for the West Virginia State Bar Programs and at West Virginia University. Mr. Sullivan was survived by his companions, Hope Hartz and Miss Unique; his sons, Willard A. III and Aaron A.; daughter, Jennifer R.; brothers. Gerald K. and D. Michael; and his mother.

THOMAS JOSEPH SWAN, JR. died of cancer on March 5, 2011, in West Palm Beach, Florida. He was born in Boston on June 5, 1942, the son of Thomas and Helen Reilly Swan, and prepared at St. Sebastian's School, in Newton, Massachusetts. At Harvard he lived in Leverett House and was a member of Pi Eta, the Hasty Pudding Club, and St. Paul Church. He earned his MBA at the University of Chicago in 1966. He was chairman and chief executive officer of the family business, The Swan Group, which has worldwide business holdings in the areas of manufacture and distribution of heating, plumbing, and well water products, as well as real estate. He was also a philanthropist who sat on many boards, including McLean Hospital and especially his alma mater, St. Sebastian's, where he was a founding member of the board of trustees, president of trustees from 1978 to 1984, a member of the board of incorporators, and finally, since 2009, trustee emeritus. He was a board member and past president of the Wianno Club, of Osterville, on Cape Cod. A Harvard benefactor, he served on the Committee on University Resources and the Advisory Committee on Shareholder Responsibility. A passion for horse racing, which began at the age of nine when his grandfather took him to the track in Saratoga, continued throughout his life: he owned many horses over the years, bred them, fed them, made and lost money on them, studied thousands of racing forms, and enjoyed every minute. He was known as an impeccable dresser and a gifted conversationalist. He was survived by his wife of forty-four years, Carroll (Donahue); a son, Thomas III '91; and a brother, Joseph.

JOHN NICHOLSON TALBOT died February 25, 1966, in Boston, where he was born October 27, 1942, the son of Nathan Bill Talbot '32, MD '36, and Anne (Perry) Talbot. He prepared at Milton Academy, Milton, Massachusetts, and attended Harvard with our Class. Talbot was a resident of Lowell House and a member of the Hasty Pudding. Talbot was survived by his parents, and two brothers, one of whom, Nathan Dennison Talbot, is a member of Harvard '58.

IVAN ALEXANDROVITCH TCHEREPNIN died April 11, 1998, at Boston, Massachusetts. The son of Aleksandr N. and Lee Hsien-Ming Tcherepnin, he was born on February 5, 1943, in Paris, France. He graduated from the Francis W. Parker School, Chicago, Illinois, before coming to Harvard, where he received an AB, cum laude, in 1964. Mr. Tcherepnin traveled to Europe after graduation to study musical composition with Karlheinz Stockhausen and Pierre Boulez. He then went on to teach, both at San Francisco Conservatory and at Stanford. At that time, Mr. Tcherepnin met and was influenced by John Cage and the avant-garde pianist David Tudor. In the late 1960s, he returned to Harvard, where he earned an AM in musical composition. A third-generation composer, he followed his father's example of writing for neglected instruments by writing for the then-new field of electronic music. For the past twenty-five years, Mr Tcherepnin had served as the director of Harvard's Electronic Music Studio. During that time, he was also an integral member of Harvard's music faculty, where he was noted for his classes in harmony. In 1996, Mr. Tcherepnin was awarded a $150,000 University of Louisville Grawemeyer Award for his Double Concerto for Violin, Cello, and Orchestra, which he debuted leading the Greater Boston Youth Symphony Orchestra accompanied by soloists Yo-Yo Ma and Lynn Chang. He was survived by his wife, Sue-Ellen Hershman-Tcherepnin; his children from his marriage to Anne Doerres, daughter, Sarina, and sons, Nicholas, Stefan, and Sergei; and two brothers, Peter '60 and Serge '63.

THOMAS DAVID TEWS died May 23, 2011, in Colorado Springs, Colorado. Born February 19, 1942, in Duluth, Minnesota, he attended St. Paul Central High School. He lived in Dunster House while at Harvard, lettered in varsity lightweight crew, belonged to the Hasty Pudding Club, and received his AB with the Class in 1964. In 1967 he completed a JD at the University of Minnesota. He fulfilled his military obligation in the US Naval Research in California. Retired in 2004 from a varied career, mostly as an attorney, he worked in large and small law firms and for publicly and privately held corporations; for a time had a solo law practice; taught at Miami University, in Oxford, Ohio; and at his retirement had a job synopsizing federal court cases for publication on Lexis.com. His journey took him from Minnesota to Washington, DC, to Illinois to Ohio and finally to Colorado Springs, where he spent the last fifteen years of his life. He was survived by his wife of thirty-six years, Paula (DeFilippo); a son, Arthur; a sister, Helen Jane Johnson; and a grandson.

STEPHEN NAYLOR THOMAS of Tampa, Florida, died December 4, 2001. A former professor of philosophy at the Universities of Washington and Southern Florida, he was the author of The Formal Mechanics of Mind and Practical Reasoning in Natural Language. He was also a sailor and world traveler.

NANCY TILLEY SNYDER died September 18, 2005, in Fort Worth, Texas. The daughter of Rice Matthews and Lucille Kelly Tilley, she was born in Fort Worth on January 14, 1942, graduated from Arlington Heights High School there, and was a lifelong resident of the city. She lived in East House during her freshman year at Radcliffe and then transferred to Pine Manor Junior College, in Wellesley, where she completed an associate in arts degree in 1962; she received her BA from the University of Texas, Austin, in 1964. A homemaker who devoted herself to charitable activities in her city, she supported the arts and many service organizations, including the United Way, Salvation Army, Cancer Care Services, and the Child Development Center at the downtown YWCA. She was a Cub Scout den mother, a ranked tennis player, and a gourmet cook. She was survived by her husband, John, MBA '68; three sons, J. Todd, Dudley, and Marcus; and a brother, Rice, Jr.

DAVID ROBINSON TIMRUD died January 27, 1962, at Kingston, New York. The son of David Hugh and Mary (Robinson) Timrud, he was born October 29, 1942, in St. Louis, Missouri. He came to Harvard from the Kingswood School, West Hartford, Connecticut, and spent two years with our Class as a resident of Leverett House.

JOHN LIVINGSTONE TOLLACK died July 5, 2010, in Cincinnati, Ohio. The son of Layton E. and Esther Johnson Tollack, he was born in West Bend, Wisconsin, on November 15, 1942, and graduated from West Bend High School. During his Harvard years he lived in Quincy House and was a member of the Spee Club, Hasty Pudding, Crimson Key Society, and Phillips Brooks House; he received his AB in 1965. He pursued a PhD in physiology at the University of Cincinnati, completing it in 1970, then stayed to get an MD in 1974, followed by residency in general surgery at Good Samaritan Hospital in Cincinnati. He worked as a physician with Group Health Associates in Cincinnati from 1985 to 2000. He was survived by a sister, Laurie Bruns.

RICHARD MILLER TRAVIS of Linwood, Washington, died September 2, 2004. He was a lawyer and a poet. He leaves his wife, Jennifer Taylor, two daughters, Alexandria and Laura, and a son, Richard.

NANCY ELISABETH TRUMBULL died April 15, 2009, in Jersey City, N.J. She worked as an environmental lawyer for the Environmental Protection Agency in Washington, DC, and later for the Natural Resources Defense Council in New York City. Beginning in the 1980s, she battled mental illness for three decades; in 1988 she starred in a short film directed by her daughter, Shores of Mania, which won several awards for its insights into the elusive nature of sanity. She had a lifelong love of nature and the outdoors. She leaves her daughter, Rachel Othmer '88, and her former husband, David Othmer '63.

PETER ANDREAS TSCHERNING died January 3, 1996. The son of Adam Tobias and Ellen (Ingwersen) Tscherning, he was born on December 6, 1941, in New York, New York. He prepared at Phillips Exeter Academy, Exeter, New Hampshire, before coming to Harvard, where he graduated summa cum laude, as of our Class. Mr. Tscherning remained at Harvard to earn an AM in 1968. A member of Phi Beta Kappa, he was a scholar of Ancient and Modern Greek and Latin and taught both subjects at Smith College, from 1976 to 1979. He later moved to New York City, where he began working as a translator for the United Nations. The son of Danish diplomats, Mr. Tscherning later returned to Denmark to work as a translator. He also taught English in Sweden for a short time. During the last six years of his life, Mr. Tscherning devoted his time to fighting the spread of AIDS and to AIDS education and awareness. He was a member of the Columbia Presbyterian Hospital AIDS Clinical Trial Advisory Board as well as serving as a board member, funding strategist, writer, and street volunteer for ADAPT, an organization working to combat the spread of AIDS and other diseases among the drug-using population.

HARRY VINCENT TURNER of Lane Cove, Australia, died December 5, 2002. He worked as an economist for Esso and Cadbury Schweppes before starting his own accounting business. Born at Bondi Beach, he was a natural athlete: a swinming and surfing champion in Australia who narrowly missed a spot on the 1960 Olympic swimming team. He took part in many competitions over the years, including the Hawaiian Ironman, the Hawkesbury Canoe Classic, and the Murray Marathon. A devoted coach and mentor to swimmers of all ages, he helped found the Aussi Masters swim team and also organized the first-ever swimming Calcutta, an annual handicap event. He leave his wife, Margaret (Dearsley), and a daughter, Fiona.

CASEY ALLEN UNDERHILL died December 16, 2010, in Jordan, Minnesota. The son of Harold and Edna Underhill, he was born in Minneapolis on July 23, 1942, and attended Hopkins High School in Minnetonka. At Harvard he lived in Leverett House and was a member of the tennis team, receiving his AB, cum laude in history, with the Class in 1964. After completing a JD at Columbia University in 1967, he served in the navy in Vietnam. He practiced law in Southern California for a while and also in Minnesota with the firm of Oppenheimer Wolff & Donnelly before opening a solo practice in the Minneapolis suburbs. He was an avid golfer. He was survived by a brother, Gary.

JOHN CHARLES VOOSEN died September 15, 2006, in Los Angeles, California. He was born in Detroit, Michigan, on December 13, 1942, and prepared at Campion School. While at Harvard he lived in Leverett House and was a member of the track team and Crimson staff; he received his AB, cum laude, with the Class in 1964 and the BArch degree from the Design School in 1968. A third-generation Chicago architect, he began his career in his father's firm, Gaul & Voosen, later renamed John C. Voosen Architects. Early on, his planning and design work was primarily in multifamily housing, but he grew to specialize in the design of churches and church renovations. In 1999 he joined Church Building Consultants, of Wheaton, Illinois, as chief architect; his last design was for Three Rivers Church in Plainfield. He moved to Los Angeles in 2000. He was an enthusiastic fly-fisherman and kayaker. He was survived by his wife of forty years, Deborah (Quarles), and a daughter, Elizabeth.

JOHN ANTHONY DRUMMOND WALKER died October 14, 1986, at Pondicherry, India. He was born June 30, 1942, in Washington, DC, and attended Portsmouth Priory in Portsmouth, RI. A resident of Eliot House, he received his AB cum laude in 1966. John Walker was survived by his parents, John and Margaret Walker of Washington and London, and by his brother, Gillian Walker.

WALTER ANDREWS "RUFUS" WANNING died of cancer on May 10, 2013, in Orland, Maine. He was born in Boston on January 6, 1942, the son of Andrews and Patricia Wanning, and prepared at Phillips Exeter Academy. A Quincy House resident at Harvard, he received his AB, cum laude in general studies, in 1965. He traveled to Europe after graduation to study philosophy at Heidelberg and Cambridge Universities, only to discover that the thing that made him happiest was working outdoors. He moved to the coast of Maine and became a master arborist. He founded Wanning Tree Service, best-known for its work saving the stately, towering elms at the centers of such towns as Blue Hill and Castine from the scourge of Dutch elm disease. A lifelong activist for peace, social justice, and environmental causes, he was affiliated with the Peninsula Peace and Justice Center, Maine People's Alliance, Hancock County Democrats, Great Pond Mountain Conservation Trust, and Blue Hill Heritage Trust, and was a trained volunteer for Hospice of Hancock County. He was proud of managing his life with bipolar disorder and committed to mentoring others with the same problem; in accordance with his wishes, his brain was donated to the Harvard Brain Tissue Research Center, to aid in research on psychiatric disorders. A first marriage to Virginia "Dindy" (Royster) ended in divorce in 1993. He was survived by his wife of eleven years, Margaret de Rivera; a daughter, Martha "Molly" Cooper; a son, Alton "Andy"; four stepchildren; a sister, Esther; a brother, Thomas; and a granddaughter.

DAVID REID WARD died June 11, 1968, at New Haven, Connecticut. The son of Howard Reid and Virginia (Cochrane) Ward, he was born May 13, 1943, in Quincy, Massachusetts. He prepared at the local high school in Quincy before coming to Harvard where he received an AB, cum laude, in 1964. Ward was a drillmaster in the Band while at Harvard and resided in Leverett House. He was also a graduate of Connecticut College and was a teacher in Hamden (Conn.) High School for three years. He was survived by his parents.

PETER JACK WARSHALL died of cancer on April 26, 2013, in Tucson, Arizona. He was born in El Paso, Texas, on December 6, 1943, and attended Stuyvesant High School in New York City. He lived in Adams House while at Harvard and belonged to the Harvard Band, Friends of Hillel, and the Harvard Outing Club, receiving his AB in 1965. He completed a PhD in biological anthropology at Harvard in 1973. On the way, he lived with baboons in Kenya and studied cultural anthropology under a Fulbright Fellowship in Paris with anthropologist Claude Lévi- Strauss. In the 1970s he moved to California, where he became science editor of the Whole Earth Catalog and the Co-Evolution Quarterly. He also designed septic systems, writing the first book on the ecology of septic disposal, Septic Tank Practices: A Guide to the Conservation and Reuse of Household Wastewaters, and, as an elected official in the town of Bolinas, implemented the country's first total recycling sewage system. He moved to Arizona in the 1980s and worked in the University of Arizona's Office of Arid Land Studies. During the Ethiopian drought of 1984, he worked for the UN High Commission on Refugees, attempting to improve conditions for the population and mitigate the ecological impact. He collaborated for years with the Apache Survival Coalition to prevent destruction of the ecosystem of Mount Graham, home to the endangered red squirrel. He taught eco-poetics at Naropa University, in Boulder, Colorado, and taught natural systems analysis in the MBA program at Presidio Graduate School, in San Francisco. An ardent conservationist who believed that biologists have a duty to become "biogladiators" in defense of the earth's biodiversity, he served on the boards of many nonprofits, including the All Species Foundation, the Sky Island Alliance, Scientists for the Preservation of Mount Graham, and the World Innovation Foundation. In recent years he was science coordinator and a founding board member of the Northern Jaguar Project, which, in partnership with a Mexican conservation group, Naturalia, owns and manages a Sonora reserve embracing seventy-eight square miles of prime jaguar habitat. He also directed Bioneers' Dreaming New Mexico project, a comprehensive ecological assessment of the state's agricultural and energy policies. He was survived by his wife of twenty-nine years, Diana Hadley; two daughters, Sadie Hadley and Lida Hadley; a son, Seth Hadley; two sisters, Susan Perlstein and Hannah Zeller; and seven grandchildren.

MICHAEL WECHSLER died May 16, 1969, at New York City. He was born October 16, 1942, in Washington, DC, the son of James Arthur and Nancy (Fraenkel) Wechsler. He prepared at Fieldston School in New York City and attended Harvard with our Class. While at Harvard he was a resident of Leverett House. Michael was a marketing researcher on medical leave from Harvard and had also worked as an occupational therapist at Gracie Square Hospital in New York. He was survived by his parents and a sister.

JAMES RONALD WEIR died of cancer on November 17, 2013, in Tiverton, Rhode Island. He was born October 14, 1942, in San Diego and prepared at Lawrenceville School, in Lawrenceville, New Jersey. A Dunster House resident and letter winner in lacrosse while at Harvard, he also belonged to the Delphic Club and Hasty Pudding. He received his AB, cum laude in architectural studies, with the Class in 1964 and an MArch from the Harvard Graduate School of Design in 1970. He spent the two years following graduation in the Peace Corps in Tunisia as an apprentice architect. He then embarked on a long career as an architect, preservationist, and developer in Massachusetts and Rhode Island. He worked for Shepley, Bulfinch, Richardson and Abbott and The Architects Collaborative before founding his own firm, Eastdesign Architects, in 1979. A lover of the natural world, he believed strongly that economic development, appreciation of the arts, and conservation can and must be pursued in concert. He and his wife spent three decades restoring and renovating the 300-year-old village of Tiverton Four Corners, in Rhode Island; they also founded an arts center and helped to develop Farmcoast, a nonprofit to support local businesses and attract tourism while protecting the farmland and coastal areas south of Boston. He was a board member of the Boston Preservation Alliance and the Cambridge Center for Adult Education. He was survived by his wife of fortytwo years, Rosalind (Meschan); two daughters, Cara and Lizza; two sons, Oliver and Chester; a sister, Vivien Russe '67; two brothers, William and Gordon, MD '67; and six grandchildren.

JUSTIN LAWRENCE WELLS died December 18, 2006, in Columbus, Ohio. He was born in Logan, Ohio, on September 16, 1942, to James Dunlap and Helen Brandt Wells, and attended Logan High School. He spent just a year with the Class, transferring after freshman year to Ohio University. He retired in 1999 after a long career as a senior scheduler for Goodyear Tire and Rubber Company in Logan. A mainstay of his community over a lifetime, he served on the board of education and on the Tri-County Vocational School Board. He was an active member of the Hocking County United Way, the Hocking Hills Artists and Craftsmen Association, and the Hocking County Boy Scout Council. For two decades he volunteered as a spotter for the Logan High School football team and also coached the flag, seventh- and eighth-grade, and freshman football teams. In addition, he and his family maintained downtown Logan's celebrated Christmas light display for many years. He was inducted into the Logan High School Hall of Fame in 1993 and received the Barton Hall Citizenship Award from the town in 2003. He was survived by his wife, Sandra (Gabriel); two daughters, Jacquelyn Sheets and Julie Rioch; three sisters, Mimi Hammer, Verna Helber, and Roberta Myers; and six grandchildren.

FRANCIS ABEKEN WESTBROOK died on September 22, 1991, in Shelton, Connecticut. He was born on March 28, 1942 in Brooklyn, New York. He prepared at Exeter Academy in Exeter, New Hampshire. At Harvard his concentration was in history and literature, and he was a member of Phillips Brooks House. He received an AB, magna cum laude, in 1964 and a PhD from Yale in 1972. In the Fifteenth Report, Westbrook stated that he was Assistant Professor of Chinese at the University of Wisconsin, Madison. He was married at that time to Rachel Horwitz and had two sons, Brendan and Benjamin.

MARJORIE KITCHEL WHALLON NOBLE died September 10, 1974, in a plane crash that was the result of a Greek terrorist bombing. The daughter of Robert Edward and Dorothy (Curme) Whallon, she was born August 8, 1943, in Richmond, Indiana. She received her AB, cum laude, from Radcliffe with our Class. Noble was associated with the department of geology at Stanford University.

THOMAS DOW WICKENS died December 16, 2012, in San Francisco, California, of Lou Gehrig's disease. He was born June 30, 1942, in Madison, Wisconsin, and prepared at University School in Columbus, Ohio. A Quincy House resident while at Harvard, he was a member of the Psychology Society and Mountaineering Club and received his AB, cum laude in general studies, in 1964. He went to Brown for his graduate studies in experimental psychology, earning his PhD in 1968, and then pursued a postdoctoral fellowship at Stanford. He was a professor of psychology at the University of California, Los Angeles, for thirty-four years before joining the faculty of the University of California, Berkeley, in 2003, retiring in 2011 as a professor emeritus after the onset of his illness. A specialist in mathematical models in psychology, he was the author of many articles and several books, including The Geometry of Multivariate Statistics and Elementary Signal Detection Theory. Before his disability restricted his activities, he loved to travel and attend opera and greatly enjoyed hiking and pack trips in the Rocky Mountains and Sierra Nevada. A first marriage to Sheila Tuchapsky ended in divorce in 1977. He was survived by his wife of twenty-three years, Lucia Bogatay, MArch '69, and a brother, Christopher '67.

WOODWARD ADAMS WICKHAM died January 18, 2009, in Chicago. Former editor-in-chief of the Lampoon, he taught at a Mexican university and served as director of development at Hampshire College, in Amherst, Massachusetts, before joining the MacArthur Foundation in 1990 as a vice president and senior program adviser. He oversaw the foundation's grants to public television, backing such groundbreaking PBS series as Frontline and P.O.V. He played an important role in developing Hoop Dreams, the acclaimed 1994 documentary about two Chicago high-school basketball phenoms, working with the filmmakers from an early stage. He also expanded the foundation's work in the field of human rights, providing money and ideas for the International Criminal Court. After leaving the MacArthur Foundation in 2003 he served as president of the Weil Foundation, the brainchild of Dr. Andrew Weil '63. He was an enthusiastic fly-fisherman. He leaves two sisters, Susan Maire and Diana Meyer-Buchanan, and a brother, Robert Buchanan, MLA '56.

LAIDLAW BOSWORTH "BOZ" WILLIAMS died of cancer on May 7, 2011, in Guerneville, California. The son of Laidlaw and Abbie Lou Williams, he was born October 16, 1942, in Carmel, California, and attended Carmel High School. He was a Kirkland House resident and member of the sailing team while at Harvard, but transferred after sophomore year to the University of California, Berkeley, where he received his BA in geology. His lifelong passion for the California wilderness was informed by an extensive knowledge of landforms and flora. A back-to-the-earth farmer and naturalist, he tended an abundant vegetable garden on his Sonoma County property. His family never needed to buy produce; he made cheese from the milk of the family goat and hot sauce from his own, homegrown jalapeńo, Anaheim, and habańero peppers. He remodeled and expanded his little house using carpentry skills he taught himself. He was a dedicated supporter of conservationist causes, including protection of native plant species and preservation of open space. He was survived by his wife, Kathrin; three children, Caleb, Jesse, and Nisha; a sister, Alice Meyers; and four grandchildren.

LOUIS GERRY WILLIAMS died January 21, 1965, at Cambridge, England. The son of John Gilmore Williams, LLB '40, and Phyllis (Gerry) Williams, he was born November 3, 1942, in Providence, Rhode Island. He prepared at Phillips Exeter Academy, Exeter, New Hampshire, and at Harvard received an AB, cum laude, in 1964. Louis was All-Ivy League in soccer (captain in his senior year), one of Harvard's top all-time scorers in lacrosse, and a member of one of Harvard's greatest squash teams, winning three letters in each sport. He was a resident of Eliot House and a member of the A.D. Club and the Hasty Pudding Institute. At the time of his death, Louis was studying abroad on a Fiske scholarship awarded to him following his graduation. "Lou Williams spent four years with our class; we elected him Second Marshal. That rare commodity the nine letterman, he attained, moreover, All-America recognition in soccer, squash and lacrosse. Medicine was to be his calling, although his family has earned its high reputation primarily in the law, which would have suited him equally well. His probing, energetic, skeptical mind produced, among other achievements, a string of grades in his pre-medical courses which only once dipped so low as A-. He had a passion for sky-diving, and he learned to fly so well while in college that he had an instructor's license by graduation. He also made hosts of friends who, after his death at Trinity College, Cambridge, in the winter of 1965, established a soccer trophy and inscribed it to the memory of 'so beloved a product of his college and his time.' It is tempting to conclude that he would have been a giant of medicine, although many exacting and unpredictable tests lay ahead. It seems at least fair to say that by his death society lost an unusually rich potential."

DOUGLAS BORIS WOLF died March 16, 2009, in San Francisco, California. He was born in Brooklyn, New York, on October 20, 1942, and graduated from Trenton (New Jersey) High School. A resident of Kirkland House, he spent only two years officially with the Class. He was a chemistry prodigy who, legend has it, during sophomore year simultaneously took Chem 60 (Professor Kistiakowsky's notoriously difficult junior-level physical chemistry course), Chem 105 (a first-year graduate-level course on physical organic chemistry—for which he had taken neither of the prerequisites), and an upper-level graduate course on advanced physical organic chemistry, and aced them all. However, having ignored his Gen Ed requirements and consequent warnings from the dean's office, he was barred from registering for his junior year; for some time thereafter he lived in the basement of Mallinckrodt Hall, spending his days in a large, green-leather armchair behind a desk piled high with reprints of papers from chemistry journals. He developed cognitive impairments after moving to California in the 1960s, and the Class has no information about his later career or interests. He leaves no immediate survivors.

SUSAN WOODWARD FINE died March 8, 2013, in Elmira, New York, from complications of pneumonia. Born in Alice, Texas, on January 17, 1943, she prepared at the Hockaday School in Dallas. A mathematics concentrator at Radcliffe, she also competed in tennis and volunteered with Phillips Brooks House. She received her AB with the Class in 1964. She went to Cornell for graduate study in mathematical sociology, working as a teaching assistant there in the 1960s and completing her MA in 1978. While raising her children she remained active in the university community both as a scholar and as a faculty wife. She was survived by a daughter, Jennifer Jilot; a son, David Fine; three sisters, Jan Fox '72, Jo Moore, and Dow O'Brien; two brothers, Jack Woodward and Roger Henry; a stepbrother, Tuck Henry; her former husband, Terrence Fine, PhD '64; and two granddaughters.

JARED LEONARD WRIGHT died September 3, 1967, at Madera County, California. The son of Arthur Ingham and Mary (Power) Wright, he was born September 29, 1942, in Albany, New York. He prepared at the local high school in Rutland, Vermont, and at Harvard received an AB, summa cum laude, in 1964. Wright resided in Lowell House, was associated with the Crimson, and was a member of the Physics Club.

JUDITH LING-SHIH YEE of New York City died in the crash of TWA Flight 800 on July 17, 2000. The daughter of Samuel Lin and Doris Dichee (Loo) Yee, she was born on August 6, 1942, in Honolulu, Hawaii. She prepared at Punahou School, Honolulu, Hawaii, before coming to Harvard, where she received an AB in 1964. While a student at Radcliffe, Ms. Yee was a resident of Comstock and was a member of the Phillips Brooks House. She was a retired systems analyst and office automation consultant for Mobil Oil. An animal-welfare activist, especially for dogs, she helped establish the dog run in Washington Square Park and was an active volunteer in pet-therapy programs. Her Cairn terrier, Max, died with her. Her survivors include her two brothers, Ronald W. K. and G. Robert; her mother; and her former husband, Jonathan R. Price '63.


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